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MelanieW
2nd May 2007, 12:03
Skinny models off the runway.

Its a very good idea - and its also a catchy slogan.

Someone has actually started marketing a t-shirt with that phrase emblazoned on it. Witness:

SkinnyModelsofftheRunway.com (http://www.skinnymodelsofftherunway.com/)

I learned about this from the following article, which includes comments from the person who started the campaign as to his premise:

http://www.11alive.com/news/article_news.aspx?storyid=96305&provider=top

The most interesting quote in that article is the following:

"I think [the fashion industry] is targeting more plus size models," senior Jamil Pratt said. "They are still using thin models, because they think thin sells, but as we go forward more people are realizing that average-size models can do what skinny models do."

"It just takes one big fashion designer, saying, I want to show a different view, and others will fall in line," Anderson added.
Which serves as a good reminder that what is just as important in getting the skinny models off the runway is to put plussize models on the runway.

Hopefully, the two developments will go hand in hand...

Chad
14th May 2007, 14:59
"Skinny Models off the Runway?" I'll support that - and I'll silently add the phrase, "and the sooner the better!"

T-shirts are actually a very clever, grass-roots way to spread a positive message - a message that's all the more effective when the t-shirts in question are donned by buxom beauties (to remind everyone what the fashion industry is depriving society of, when it puts skinny models on the runway, instead of voluptuous goddesses).

This campaign reminds me of the Japanese supporter of plus-size beauty who created the slogan "Onna Wa Niku" to promote size celebration, and who is doing well selling t-shirts with this slogan in Japan, as was discussed on this forum last fall:

http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=736

That Japanese slogan literally translates as "Women are flesh," but I've also heard that it more precisely connotes the idea that, "Women look best with flesh," or "Women look best when they have more flesh."

(It sounds more poetic in Japanese, but the idea is sound.)

HSG
8th July 2007, 06:14
<br>The slogan is very clever, and the premise--of getting skinny models off the runway--is not only valid, but urgently required, for the health of the girls in the profession and, more importantly, for the health of young women in general.

As innumerable studies have now demonstrated, the presence of skinny models <i>on</i> the runway causes and propagates eating disorders among young women (and even sometimes leads of the deaths of the models themselves). Underweight models are both a severe health hazard for society, and are risking their own lives. It is long past time for this toxic, unnatural standard of appearance to be banished from public view--by the fashion industry itself, or, more likely, by government action.

This campaign is an example of a clever grassroots effort to advance the cause of size celebration. How wonderful it would be to see an audience filled with women wearing these T-shirts at the next round of fashion shows featuring walking cadavers.


This campaign reminds me of the Japanese supporter of plus-size beauty who created the slogan "Onna Wa Niku" to promote size celebration, and who is doing well selling t-shirts with this slogan in Japan, as was discussed on this forum last fall
As an interesting follow-up to the <i>"Onna Wa Niku"</i> campaign, an article by Shinsuke Ando in the Japanese literary publication <i>Poetica</i> reveals that full-figured beauty was also revered in pre-modern Japan. Ando reveals that "in the age of <i>The Tale of Genji</i>" (a seminal Japanese novel of the 11th century), the "plump" face was "decisively preferred" (8).

Furthermore, this ideal was not transitory, but seems to have endured throughout the centuries. In the novel <i>The Life of an Amorous Woman</I> (1686) by Ihara Saikaku, among the characteristics that identify the ideal lover or mistress is that "the face is slightly plump and pink," as Ando notes (8).

This interesting fact confirms the universality of timeless beauty, but it also reminds us of the glaring absence of gorgeous Oriental plus-size models in the fashion industry, particularly when compared to the prolific representation of other visible minorities. Let us hope that this deficiency is remedied in the near future.

Yanderis (Dorothy Combs, Miami)--test image featuring a gorgeous hairstyle:

<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/yanderis/test07.jpg"></center><p><strong>................

Work Cited</strong>:

Ando, Shinsuke. "The Idea of Feminine Beauty: A Comparative Note." <i>Poetica (Japan)</i> 12 (1979): 3-9.