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HSG
22nd August 2005, 21:28
<br>Earlier today, we received a heartbreaking message from a long-time reader of this forum, who resides in Romania. She writes:

<p><blockquote><i>My daughter is six, just turned seven, and somewhere in the range of 55 lbs, with a little pooh tummy (and you should see her, she is half Hungarian and gorgeous), has been already told by people she is f**. It infuriates me. I have myself struggled with eating disorder for over twenty years which culminated in removal of my terminal ileum. I am hearing more and more about the correlation of body abuse with intestinal disease and cancer. So when somebody calls my daughter, who is still a very young child, F**, I get crazy.</i></blockquote><p>This message caused us considerable anguish. It reveals how shockingly early full-figured girls must withstand attacks on their appearance.

Girls should not have to endure derogatory terms like f** at any age, but for one to be subjected to such language at <i>seven,</i> is maddening.

At least the girl's mother is clearly determined to resist any efforts by society to make her daughter ashamed of her perfectly normal appearance. If every mother took such a stance, who knows how many young girls would be impervious to the self-destructive brainwashing that led to the reader's own, tragic health problems.

Let's not forget the common factor between the experiences of curvy vixens Kelsey Olson and Christina Schmidt: both young ladies--who possess such wonderful self-confidence, and well-justified pride in their own appearance--testify to the support and encouragement that they regularly receive from their families.

Our Romanian reader's anecdote reminds us just how <i>unnatural</i> modern thin-indoctrination really is. The efforts to instil shame in full-figured girls via the school system is sinister enough, but the attempt to provoke curve-o-phobia in <i>parents,</i> and to make <i>them</i> the abettors of the weight-loss industries, is utterly criminal. This is a perversion of the most basic impulse of motherhood, which is to provide sustenance for her children.

Thankfully, when we escape the insanity of the modern world, and immerse ourselves in cutures that embraced natural principles, we find much more wholesome and nurturing relationships between mothers and daughters. Indeed, in such societies, <i>Mutterliebe</i> was considered a thing of beauty, and was celebrated in works of art.

As an example, consider the follow poem from 1827, titled <i>Schlechtes Wetter</i> ("Terrible Weather"), penned by the noted German Romantic poet Heinrich Heine. This is one of the most beautiful lyrics in the German language, and was famously set to music by the great composer Richard Strauss.

Here is a simple translation of this lovely poem. (Native speakers can easily find the German text online.)

<blockquote><i>What terrible weather! There's a
raging storm, and rain, and snow.
I'm sitting at the window, looking
out into the darkness.

A solitary little light is glimmering,
and moving slowly across the
street. A motherly little woman
totters along with her lantern.

I think she's been buying some
flour and eggs and butter to bake a
cake for her big, darling daughter.

She's lying at home in the easy
chair, blinking sleepily at the light.
Her golden curls flow softly over
her sweet face.</i></blockquote>(Note that the word <i>"große"</i> also carries the meaning "grown up," which would render the line, <i>"for her grown-up, darling daughter"</i>--but "big," in the sense of "plump," is primarily meant.)

There is something so heartwarming and touching about the picture of a mother venturing out into the cold weather, just to obtain the ingredients to bake a cake to please her well-fed daughter. This is a loving portrait of the natural relationship between mother and daughter, which is not just selfless, but one in which the mother actually derives <i>joy</i> from ensuring that her daughter is fully contented and happy.

The young girl who grows up in such a relationship is sure to enjoy a healthy self-image. And the culture that venerates such a bond between mother and daughter is a rich culture indeed.

And in such a society, the thought that a mother could be persuaded to deny food to her daughter, let alone to undermine her self-esteem, would be considered . . . monstrous.

Angelo Asti beauty, with <i>"golden curls flow[ing] softly over her sweet face"</i>:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/asti08.jpg"></center>

kirsten
23rd August 2005, 16:38
"At least the girl's mother is clearly determined to resist any efforts by society to make her daughter ashamed of her perfectly normal appearance. If every mother took such a stance, who knows how many young girls would be impervious to the self-destructive brainwashing that led to the reader's own, tragic health problems."

Exactly. A mother who is proud of herself and her womanhood will pass that message on to her daughter. Unfortunately, poor body image and eating disorders are now being handed down from grandmother to mother to daughter. It is a tragedy yet the mentality is so entrenched in the media and is rewarded by people who do not have the girl's or the woman's best interests in mind. That's why we need plus-sized models front and center, to remind people of beauty and radiance. The first time I saw MODE magazine in its heyday, my own outlook about myself changed.

Lovely painting.