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M. Lopez
12th July 2007, 07:43
This is one of the most favourable news items to come down the wire in a long time.

Rome (Italy) has banned not just one or two, but 15 starving models from its fashion show.

Here's the link:

http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/lifestyle-fashion/stylenews/Fashion-3627.html

I've also posted the text of this extremely important story below.

And if anyone doesn't think that the models really are endangering their health (and their lives), note the absolutely shocking report that one of the malnourished models actually fainted during the try-outs, from starvation.

Skinny Models Kicked Off Rome Catwalk
12th July 2007 09:27:46

Fifteen underweight models have been removed from a Rome fashion show after they were thought to be too thin.

Italian designer Raffaella Curiel had specifically asked that abnormally thin models not to be used in his shows.

"I had to fire 15 who were under size 36 (UK size 8)," Curiel told reporters.

"One girl fainted during the trials," he said, "I had to give her a ham sandwich."

This decision comes just days after London Fashion Week announced plans to ban underage models from this September's shows.

A panel of experts have recommended that young models be removed from the shows due to the dangers posed by the insufficiently regulated industry.

The Independant Model Health Inquiry was set up following the high profile deaths of two underweight models last year.

The report also recognised the dangers of underweight models within the fashion industry.

"We have been given startling medical evidence about the prevalence and impact of eating disorders in certain high-risk industries."

However the panel has yet to reccommend a ban of anorexic models from London Fashion Week despite public pressure.

n January London Fashion Week organisers refused to agree to a ban on size zero models even after pressure from designers and MPs. As a result they lost 620,000 of funding from Mayor Ken Livingston and the London Development Agency.

Other countries are already taking action. Madrid was the first to clamp down on skinny models by banning anyone with a BMI less than 18 from its fashion week. Next came Milan, opening with a plus-size show. Italian fashion chiefs then decided all their models must carry a health certificate in order to get work.
Thank God this fashion show has taken a stand against the industry's mandated anorexia. Let's hope many more fashion shows follow their example.

Graham
12th July 2007, 15:25
The especially important point in the article is this, I think:

Italian designer Raffaella Curiel had specifically asked that abnormally thin models not to be used in his shows.

"I had to fire 15 who were under size 36 (UK size 8)," Curiel told reporters.

"One girl fainted during the trials," he said, "I had to give her a ham sandwich."
Apart from the truly frightening and appalling scenario of a model literally passing out from malnutrition, what's significant is that this decision was made by a designer. It can be done! If only more designers would follow this individual's lead. Thank goodness at least one designer gets it.

Why don't they all realize that their fashions would look better on fuller, plus-size, Classically-contoured bodies (remember Crystal Renn walking for Gaultier?), and that requiring girls to be so thin that they are on the brink of fainting - indeed, on the brink of death - is so cruel and irresponsible on their part as to be truly monstrous?

Note the phrase, "abnormally thin." Finally, someone understands that catwalk androgyny IS abnormal, and that being full-figured is the natural feminine body type.

HSG
5th August 2007, 12:23
Apart from the truly frightening and appalling scenario of a model literally passing out from malnutrition, what's significant is that this decision was made by a designer.
It <i>is</i> significant--significant by virtue of singularity. Although every individual involved in the straight-size fashion industry is culpable of promoting anorexia in models, and in young women generally, designers are particularly responsible for the problem, inasmuch as it is they who have collectively imposed this anorexic standard in the first place.

Sadly, the spectacle of an emaciated model passing out from food-deprivation is not at all uncommon. Regular readers of this forum may recall a <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=707" target="_blank">thread</a> from late last year, in which we posted a video of outtakes from <i>Project Runway,</i> showing the models on that television program literally passing out on camera from self-imposed starvation. (Here is the direct <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/video/fainting.wmv">link</a> to that video.)

There is no reason for young women in their teens and early 20s, who should be in their prime of life, to be fainting from standing on a runway for several minutes--unless their bodies are severely weakened from malnutrition.

But even more frightening than watching these young women collapsing is seeing the show's aspiring designers callously snickering at the very moment that the models are passing out. How pathologically self-absorbed do designers have to be, one wonders, if their only reaction to the sight of fellow human beings endangering their health is a mocking laugh? How can these typical examples of fashion's "guiding lights" not realize that there is something seriously wrong with the standards of their industry, when these standards affect women's health in such a demonstrably harmful way? It further confirms the point in the above article, that fashion is an <i>"insufficiently-regulated industry,"</i> and one that desperately <i>needs</i> external regulation, considering the criminal irresponsibility of its creative directors.

The Rome example noted above, along with the banning of underweight models from fashion shows in Madrid and Perth, stand out as rare exceptions, singular instances of responsible behaviour by fashion's leaders. But they are too few and far between. This industry urgently needs comprehensive regulation from government bodies--real regulation, involving the complete banning of underweight girls, and an insistence on the use of fuller-figured models--for the sake of the models themselves, and for the sake of young women in general.

Kailee O'Sullivan, flushed with well-fed health and vitality, modelling for DebShops, Fall 2007:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/ko/debshops01a.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/ko/debshops01.jpg" target="_blank">Click to view at a larger size</a>