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Graham
29th October 2007, 16:23
It isn't exactly a quality bit of journalism, but it's entertaining to see Maxim magazine (of all entities) display a modicum of good beauty sense for once, naming several ropy-musculed, androgynous-looking Hollywood stars the "unsexiest women alive."

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/131410.html

They're mostly right.

Topping the list is Sarah Jessica Parker, and who can disagree? She has a severely oval, narrow, elongated face (the opposite of the round-faced timeless ideal), and a stick-thin figure. The fact that she has been proclaimed some sort of fashion "icon" indicates just how far the fashion industry's aesthetic sense is removed from actual public taste.

Second place goes to a singer named Amy Winehouse, whose skin is disfigured by repellent tattoos.

Fourth place goes to the grotesquely musculed Madonna. Such a pity what happened to her, because at the very beginning of her career, she had a soft, attractive figure. She may be the clearest example of how exercise-torture can utterly ruin any trace of beauty a woman ever possessed.

And third is Sandra Oh, who is apparently an actress on a TV show called Grey's Anatomy. Significantly, Maxim refers to her as:

Dr. McSkinny, with her cold bedside manner and boyish figure
That quote is quite revealing. With the exception of the fifth member of the list (Britney, who is wrongly included, and only there because it's fashionable to attack her), the list singles out celebrities who are clearly underweight, or who have masculinized figures.

This list is a truer representation of genuine public tastes than most such media lists ever are. Despite all of Hollywood's indoctrination, most people do not find starving or ropy-muscled celebrities attractive, and would prefer gorgeous full-figured starlets (if any ever achieved cultural prominence).

http://www.maxim.com/Entertainment/4Madonna/slideshow/7317/435.aspx

dbround
29th October 2007, 21:11
The sad thing is that every day women are under pressure to look like Madonna, Sandra Oh and their ilk. And guess who is often doing the pressuring: other women. What's the first thing women talk about to each other? Dieting, who's losing weight, and who's gaining weight. And God forbid if you have one more cookie than they do. They think it's somehow virtuous to be starving, and they slander other women for gaining weight.

Dieting, weight-loss, and exercise are the worst cults out there. Women track each other's progress and if you're not playing the "diet" game with them, they think there's something wrong with you. They are on a mission to tell others (and themselves) that the way to fashion salvation is to starve.

Millions of women pay their visits to the shrine of the diet/exercise cult every day, and unfortunately, are peer-pressured into it by other women as well as some men. These women often beat themselves up for "failing" their diets and not fitting into their last pair of jeans.

I am trying my best to wake up from the skinny Matrix but it's a long uphill battle because every which way you have friends, relatives, etc. pressuring you to starve. (Not to mention doctors. Doctors are hysterical regarding BMIs.)

I've been inspired by this forum to see the weight-loss lie for what it is: a way to enslave people to feed the diet industry and keep it growing. But it's a hard fight.

Maureen
31st October 2007, 17:05
The sad thing is that every day women are under pressure to look like Madonna, Sandra Oh and their ilk. And guess who is often doing the pressuring: other women. What's the first thing women talk about to each other? Dieting, who's losing weight, and who's gaining weight. And God forbid if you have one more cookie than they do. They think it's somehow virtuous to be starving, and they slander other women for gaining weight.
It's envy. Honestly, I think it is. At lunch with co-workers and acquaintances, my insistence on ordering dessert when I want it has provoked comments and questions like, "You're gonna eat all that?" from other women. My smiling reply, "Yes. Jealous?" is greeted either by silence from the taunter or a laughing admission -- and sometimes a request for "just a bite of that, please."

I am trying my best to wake up from the skinny Matrix but it's a long uphill battle because every which way you have friends, relatives, etc. pressuring you to starve. (Not to mention doctors. Doctors are hysterical regarding BMIs.)

I've been inspired by this forum to see the weight-loss lie for what it is: a way to enslave people to feed the diet industry and keep it growing. But it's a hard fight.
This is an inspiring place. It's helped me, and I'm glad it's helping you. Keep fighting -- you and your beauty are worth it!

Chad
1st November 2007, 18:49
Topping the list is Sarah Jessica Parker, and who can disagree?...This list is a truer representation of genuine public tastes than most such media lists ever are. Despite all of Hollywood's indoctrination, most people do not find starving or ropy-muscled celebrities attractive
So true. The remarkable thing about this list is that its conclusions are so very right, and yet it's an anomally. It's a unique example of the media judging its own standards correctly, and discovering how dismal they really are.

Anyone stepping into this century from another time would be appalled at the unattractive, underweight women whom the media calls "beautiful." They wouldn't be able to understand this phenomenon. Their "unsexiest women alive" list would match this one.

The funny thing is that you can itemize, point for point, just how hideous the Sarah Jessica Parker look is. The ideal feminine face is round - hers is narrow and elongaged ("horsey-looking"). The ideal nose is small and cute (think Christina or Kailee) - hers looks like a boxer's. The ideal figure is soft and curvy - hers is androgynously skeletal and ropy-musculed. She has a lantern jaw like a male comic-book character. And women are brainwashed into pursuing this as an ideal?

It's like someone took the blinders off, and saw the media world (and the women who star in it) for the very first time.

HSG
30th December 2007, 20:40
<br>Hypocritically (but predictably), the mainstream press was highly critical of this <i>Maxim</i> piece, yet the article simply put the shoe on the other aesthetic foot, as it were, by (rightfuly) attacking "starvation chic" instead of full-figured women. In fact, plus-size beauty is regularly excoriated in the media in terms that are far harsher that this. Turnabout is fair play, and it is extremely agreeable to see this rare instance of aesthetic revisionism. Critics were merely upset that for once, "one of their own" (i.e., <i>Maxim</i>) failed to toe the party line, and outed the rest of the industry as perpetuating a false standard.

What <i>really</I> upset the critics of this article was that, for once, a publication had exposed the media's lie, ripped back the curtain, and revealing "the great and powerful Oz" to be nothing more than a myth. It <i>was</I> a wake-up call. Suddenly, the public could look past media brainwashing and see that they had been duped--that the celebrities whom the entertainment press dubs "sexy" are anything but. They are unattractive, androgynous, and uncharismatic, and not all of the Conde Nast covers in the world can change this.

But the silliest criticism that was levelled against the article was that this was a case of "swapping one ideal for another." That creates a false moral equivalency between the two, like equating <i>poison</i> and <i>medicine.</i> One kills; the other heals.

The difference between the two is that the underweight standard is severely unhealthy and leads to life-threatening eating disorders, whereas the full-figured ideal is salubrious and pleasurable, and leads to an enjoyable life.

Far from "swapping one ideal for another," is it a case of replacing a <strong>lie</strong> with the <strong>truth</strong>; a matter of rejecting a toxic, artificial, and genuinely unattractive standard for one that is natural and truly beautiful.

From the unsexiest to possibly "the sexiest woman alive"--Charlotte Coyle (Close Models, U.K.), whose beauty would have reigned supreme in any century prior to our own--and in truth, still does today.<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cc/charlotte53.jpg"></center><p>(From the year's finest promotion, Charlotte's Spring 2007 campaign for Marks & Spencer.)

- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/charlotte4.htm">More images . . .</a>