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Hannah
4th February 2009, 03:28
I came across an astonishing article today. Not that it's astonishing because of its assertions. These are things that forum-posters here has been saying for years. No, astonishing because these comments actually found their way into print.

http://www.herald.ie/lifestyle/femme/a-womans-arsenal-is-a-splendid-thing-to-behold-1625297.html

Apparently, an Irish actress appeared at a red-carpet event in a sexy dress, and endured media criticism for it (a la Jessica Simpson). In the course of defending the actress in question, the writer of this article makes some important points about fashion. Here are the pertinent excerpts:

A woman's arsenal is a splendid thing to behold

By Dee O'Keefe

Tuesday February 03 2009

...I always smirk when I hear folks knowingly say that women dress to impress other women.

Maybe some do, but most of us quite like a bit of male attention. We get a buzz from being visually appreciated by the opposite sex but for some reason many of us feel compelled to either take on a girlish denial of any knowledge of this, or a zero-tolerance feminist approach.

I don't fall into either of those categories; "bring it on" is my motto, because it sure won't last forever.

Women were created with soft, curvaceous bodies that, in my opinion, make clothes hang beautifully. The multitude of gay, male fashion designers who favour unnaturally thin, under-developed models to display their creations miss this point entirely.

Nobody wears clothes better than a voluptuous woman. And if she's a smart, voluptuous woman, who has an innate understanding of the weapons of mass destruction that God gave her, then you can be damn sure she knows how to make them work in her favour. And why wouldn't she?
Finally, someone tells the truth about fashion.

1. Clothes look better on curvaceous bodies than on skinny frames.

2. Designers who aren't attracted to women don't get this.

And this, of course, leads to the body-image crisis that's been plaguing women for years, all because of an industry that is run by individuals who are hardwired to despise natural feminine figures.

If only more people would speak out about this.

Luminosa
6th February 2009, 20:12
I found this thread to be very interesting, as is this entire website. As a plus-size woman, I can certainly relate to the body-image crisis facing full-figured women. Between the standards of beauty foisted on us, images of very tiny women, and all the diet food commercials, it isn't hard for larger women to feel ambushed and conflicted about our bodies. It is a shame that these gay designers who expect and demand tolerance cannot themselves be tolerant of women who come in all different shapes and sizes, and create designs that flatter real-sized women.

I am glad to find a website which fosters self-acceptance for beautiful curvaceous women like myself.

M. Lopez
5th March 2009, 01:35
Luminosa is right - the hypocrisy of their attitude and actions is grotesque.

An article from a few months ago discussed this very issue. I won't post the link, for it contains blatant mixed messages, but this section is pertinent:

the Project Runway models look like they were shaped by Bodies by Dachau....

In his blog Center of Gravitas, Gayprof maintains that misogyny is as rife among gay men...Some gays nurse an "irrational fear and hatred of women's bodies."

"For many gay men," he writes, "degrading women's bodies as dysfunctional, inferior, or just plain icky becomes a means through which they attempt to build unity with other gay men."So women are supposed to pay for their "unity" through developing eating disorders while they promote their warped standard? That's selfishness raised to a sociopathic level.


The article contines:


But aren't gay fashion designers, who devote their careers to paying tribute to women, less likely than other men, straight or gay, to suffer from misogyny?

Perhaps the thinness a fashion designer decrees may not be intended to harm women. Instead, as others believe, he's only engaged in a quest to reshape the female form into an ideal of his: the adolescent male. In other words, no need to worry -- the designer is just a pedophile, not a misogynist.Hard words, but to force the fashion industry to stop promoting eating disorders through its twisted standard, hard words are needed - especially if they prompt real actions.


The article goes on:

...it might behoove the designer to head such charges off at the pass by abolishing an ideal, excessive thinness, that's either unattainable for young women or, when attained, turns out to be the exact opposite of idealIt might, but tragically, this will never happen. As we have all seen, the fashion industry is incapable of reforming on its own. Only government legislation can make this happen.

On that point, the article offers a telling comment about one fashion editor's reaction to the French bill which would rightly criminalize the promotion of anorexia:

Elle editor Maury whines about the bill wending its way through the French legislature: "It may mean that we won't be able to publish anything."YES. YES. Exactly so. And not a moment too soon.

What does that tell you about the industry, if they feel that they can't publish anything without promoting eating disorders? Such an industry shouldn't be allowed to exist. It would be like a manufacturer saying he couldn't make anything if he isn't allowed to use toxic lead paint.

Bottom line: If they feel that they can't publish a magazine without promoting anorexia, then they shouldn't publish anything at all. It's not worth it to sicken and kill tens of thousands of young girls, let alone psychologically scar the majority of women through body-hatred, just so this industry can peddle its wares, and a few fashion desigenrs can see their twisted standards in print.

HSG
23rd July 2009, 20:12
What does that tell you about the industry, if they feel that they can't publish anything without promoting eating disorders? Such an industry shouldn't be allowed to exist. It would be like a manufacturer saying he couldn't make anything if he isn't allowed to use toxic lead paint.

Bottom line: If they feel that they can't publish a magazine without promoting anorexia, then they shouldn't publish anything at all.
This is very true. The <i>Elle</I> editor's remarks are galling, but surprisingly candid. It is tantamount to an admission, on the part of the industry, of their awareness of just how toxic their aesthetic is. "If you force us to avoid harmful imagery," they are basically saying, "then we cannot publish anything." Or to put it more plainly, they are admitting that <i>harmful images are they only thing that they want to publish.</i>

They are obviously acknowledging just how appalling their aesthetic are. They <i>know</i> that they cannot meet any sensible public standard. They cannot even conceive of continuing their publications without producing images of starving models.

But this is absurd. These magazines, and indeed the entire industry, could perfectly well continue showcasing attractive fashions, cosmetics artistry, dramatic photography, etc., <i>except on models with full, curvaceous figures.</i> That editor's remark suggests that the promotion of anorexia is more important to them than any other factor; indeed, that every other aspect of fashion publishing, from clothing to makeup to photography, is secondary to the industry's true goal--which is, the glorification of emaciated androgyny (for the reasons suggested earlier in this thread).

And if that is the case, then the industry is a truly pathological entity, explicitly committed to harming society and ruining the lives of young women. The whole rotten edifice needs to be pulled down to make way for a new beginning on pro-curvy terms, with a new creative establishment comprised of individuals who favour natural femininity and full-figured beauty.

Without question, the absence of any will on the part of the current fashion establishment to reform its toxic aesthetic--indeed, its fanatical resistance to such reform--does indeed demonstrate that government intervention is needed in this area, for the well-being of young women everywhere.

Justine Legault (size 14), test image:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/ju/test09a.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/ju/test09.jpg" target="_blank">Click to view larger</a>

Chad
18th August 2009, 15:46
Finally, someone tells the truth about fashion.

1. Clothes look better on curvaceous bodies than on skinny frames.

2. Designers who aren't attracted to women don't get this.

And this, of course, leads to the body-image crisis that's been plaguing women for years, all because of an industry that is run by individuals who are hardwired to despise natural feminine figures.
It doesn't happen often, but occasionally some journalists or Web loggers do acknowledge this rather obvious (but vehemently hushed-up) fact.

For example, from a Web log that's even considered quasi-feminist comes the following post. Careful, though - the language is a bit rough:

http://www.onedatatime.com/dick_liker/2009/08/perez-hilton-thinks-he-knows-what-women-want.html

The points:

Perhaps I'm in the minority here, but I do not subscribe to the notion that gay men intrinsically "get" women, know what's best for women, or are the authority on what women should be wearing. (In fact, I think that gay men are actually the most to blame for many of the problems in the fashion industry, like the absence of womanly curves on the runway, and the hideous, figure-assaulting trend that is the tent dress, which no women who have , and no straight men who have an appreciation for [busts], have any use for.)

From the minute I heard that Perez was launching a women's site, I was not at all concerned about him "stealing" our audience, because, even if some chick will be writing it, his brand is based on vacuous frivolity with a lack of insight, and [B]commentary that could give a girl an eating disorder. Just like mainstream women's magazines!
What's especially helpful is how the author links both curvy women, and men who appreciate curvy women (i.e., the majority of the public), in a common cause. She points out how their mutual wants and inclinations are brutally suppressed by a small minority, which just happens to have a monopoly of power in fashion, and a stranglehold on media-approved "taste."

So why doesn't someone put a stop to this, once and for all? It's as bad a case of a silenced majority as I've ever seen.

These are well-known facts here at the Judgment forum, but having them acknowledged by an "edgy" Web log like this one will hopefully get the message out to a broader audience.

Maureen
19th August 2009, 20:26
These are well-known facts here at the Judgment forum, but having them acknowledged by an "edgy" Web log like this one will hopefully get the message out to a broader audience.
I have found a significant pro-beauty, pro-plus size element among "edgy" women 'bloggers (one woman even has a stunning photo of Barbara Brickner as the header image on her site). It's encouraging.