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View Full Version : Kelly Brook: ''I NEVER diet''


Chad
28th September 2005, 18:25
Count on The Daily Mirror to bring us this positive story.

Kelly Brook is something of a celebrity in England, and is up for the role of the Bond girl in the next James Bond film. She is quoted as saying that she will never diet -


"There is more pressure to be skinnier in Hollywood, but it doesn't worry me," Kelly, 25, told 3am at the Lynx-sponsored aftershow party for her new film Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo at London's Chinawhite.

"I'm always going to embrace my curvier figure, wherever I live. I never diet and I'd never do anything unhealthy. I feel sexy just as I am."

http://www.mirror.co.uk/printable_version.cfm?objectid=16182249&siteid=94762


It's the usual problem, though - like Jennifer Lopez, Kelly Brook is not actually full-figured, and can only be called "curvy" by comparison to the truly skeletal Hollywood standard.

BUT, if it's a choice between having celebrities hawking diet products or gym punishment, and celebrities who come out and condemn the practice, I think it's infinitely preferable to have the latter. Hopefully, young women will be more inspired by their words than by their figures.


Oh, and one more little article about Kelly Brook and her screen opportunity included the following quote -

"Bond films have never been about stick-thin girls. They celebrate beauty and curves."

http://www.ananova.com/entertainment/story/sm_1550024.html


I think I must have missed that Bond flick! If such film were made, I'd actually go and see it - twice. But it's a nice thought.

If the statement were true, I think Christina Schmidt would make a lovely Bond girl....

Kaitlynn
26th October 2005, 16:15
Here's a bit of celebrity fluff to add to Chad's article that might actually be worth reading, because it's just a tiny bit subversive.

It's another article about almost-curvaceous celebrities like Kelly Brook, and Charlotte Church, but what makes it more effective than most such articles is that the celebrities openly celebrate a love of food:

http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2004580002-2005490644,00.html

Here's one quote:


"Kelly Brook, Rachel Stevens and Charlotte Church have been telling Heat magazine how they just love to eat.

Model Kelly said: "Curves are sexy and I love mine. I love rich foods and I have an insatiable appetite.

"Iím different in Hollywood because Iím not one of those skinny girls. I refuse to get like that."


The other two stars make similar statements.

It's always a shame that these celebs are still so tiny, but just as their size-positive comments might actually help girls feel better about their size, these statements might help them overcome any issues that might have about food.

I think it's especially important that Ms. Brook didn't send any mixed messages about so-called "moderation" (which is just another way of giving young women a complex about eating), but openly praised "rich" foods and called her appetite "insatiable."

Hopefully, many young women will find these statements liberating.

HSG
26th October 2005, 21:48
<br>If there <i>must</i> be celebrity publicity, then this is the best form that it can possibly take.

Ms. Brook's comments in the <i>Sun</i> article are truly celebratory. It's one thing for a starlet to insist that she never diets, but it's another thing for her to acknowledge a love of food, in such an unapologetic way.

Comments such as these may help to overturn the myth that self-deprivation is somehow attractive, and bring back the natural association of indulgence with beauty, which--as we have seen in our discussions of Lillian Russell--was considered self-evident in feminine aesthetics, until the last century.

Whatever else one can say about them, populist mass-market newspapers such as the <i>Sun</i> are excellent barometers of the public mood. Therefore, if they can publish an article in which a celebrity expresses such daring sentiments, it indicates real progress in our culture.

And who knows? Thanks to articles such as these, perhaps the next time that a young goddess goes out on a romantic dinner with the beau whom her curves have attracted, she will feel less compunction about ordering whatever she likes, and genuinely enjoy the experience.

John William Godward (1861-1922), <i>The Last Bunch.</i> Note the captivating lassitude of the model, and the artist's emphasis on her soft, full limbs:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/pinacotheca/godward/godward12.jpg"></center>

Emily
28th October 2005, 06:21
I'm intrigued by the article that Kaitlynn posted, as an example of a really engaging way for celebrities to attract favourable publicity. It's a type of self-promotion that's nice, but not too nice, if you see what I mean -- not a transparent "do-gooder" publicity stunt, but something genuine.

For Kelly to acknowledge an "insatiable appetite," and a love of "rich foods," is an exciting transgression in our current media climate. It has the allure of the forbidden, because food has become a "beautiful vice." Of course, it's not really a vice at all, but it has been made to seem like one, in modern society. So Kelly's statement is quasi-rebellious, but it also has the potential to do some real good, in fostering a guilt-free attitude to food among young women.

It captures the gently subversive flavour of the original Mode.

I think if plus-size models are ever seeking publicity angles, they should consider following this approach, rather than tying themselves in knots with mixed messages about "health," that sound more like gym ads than body-positive statements.

Be daring!

(I also thought Kelly's dress in the Sun picture was very pretty, despite the paper's smart-alleck caption.)