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View Full Version : A male parallel (Dockers campaign)


Graham
11th January 2010, 17:31
The question occasionally comes up on this forum about what a male equivalent of a Judgment of Paris site would be like, what its themes would be. Here's one angle.

Most of us know the Dockers label primarily on the basis of the terrific ads that Valerie Lefkowitz did for their plus-size line a few years ago. But the company is now running an interesting campaign for men, called "Wear the Pants." Here's the main poster:

http://i46.tinypic.com/k997c4.jpg

I find it quite thoughtful. It's not telling men to be brutes, but to learn to be gentlemen once again, from opening doors for women to helping ladies across the street (a traditional Scouting motif for doing a good turn whenever possible), and generally acting a bit more like "heroes."

It's also calling on men to become mature again, to stop being trapped "between boyhood and androgyny" in a perpetual adolescence, and to grow up and be responsible. "We need grow-ups," it says. Men need to learn to be men again.

It touches on an important theme that this forum discusses in the female context, which is, that decades of brainwashing by the media duped women into denying their femininity. But by rejecting that kind of soulless, androgynous existence and reconnecting to their essential identity, some women have rediscovered themselves, and found a path to happiness and fulfillment.

Men need the same kind of essential reawakening. As the ad correctly indicates, society as a whole has suffered from the fact that men have become the disposable gender, lacking any sense of identity, any sense of themselves. Just to use one example, the proof is overwhelming that boys who grow up without fathers are many times more likely to end up in prison than those who grow up with a strong male presence in their lives.

Sure, the ad is meant to be provocative (and to sell slacks), but it conveys a valid and important idea all the same.

Oh, and the Facebook mentioned in the ad contains one page of real worth (and it's not the knee-jerk politically correct reactions on the site's wall). It's this page, which provides chilling indications of just how embattled men are in the modern world:

http://www.facebook.com/Dockers?v=app_4949752878&ref=mf

From widespread unemployment to diminishing academic success to lawbreaking, men are becoming an underclass; and yet unlike the plight of other groups, the abysmal situation of modern man is completely ignored by the mass media, by academia, and by society at large.

Just as the Judgment of Paris advocates for a restoration of true femininity, this Dockers campaign calls for a reawakening of masculinity, and such a reawakening is very much needed.

Maureen
12th January 2010, 11:24
I would take this further: all people have been reduced to their functions, what they can do. Take a look at the ever-growing self-help section of your local bookshop for proof that too many of us have forgotten that we are beings, not just doings. The denial of gender and other differences and the sinking into sameness have destroyed our psyches to the point that we have to learn how to feel our feelings.

We do need heroes. Men need to stop dropping doors on women, and women need to thank men when they do hold doors. It's not sexism; it's courtesy. We need more of it.

rayadawn
13th January 2010, 12:59
On a gut level I really agree with the idea of the Dockers campaign.

I've always disliked and disagreed with feminism that is anti-male. On a personal level, I find traditional gender roles to be more relaxing, and conducive to a harmonious home life.

I feel that some damage has been done by pitting women against men instead of seeing them as compliments. This is what this ad is all about to me.

Courtney
14th January 2010, 17:56
How refreshing and brave. This ad unapologetically calls out many of the cultural travesties that are the direct result of the politically correct directive to homogenize society. It's a refreshing and welcome perspective.

Chad
15th April 2010, 18:20
The campaign is still going strong. I saw this poster in the subway the other day and snapped a picture:

http://i44.tinypic.com/2gxmexs.jpg

Effective text:

You're not a bloke, not a fellow, chap, dude, gent, or bro-ham. Face it. You're a man.
Sure it's meant to sell slacks. But it's a solid message all the same, and if it encourages a few fellows to stop thinking of themselves as kids but to develop a more mature self-image and take responsibility for themselves, to behave in a more dignified way, like gentlemen; to take ownership of their fate contribute to a better society, I'm all for it.

Emily
4th May 2010, 12:22
I've always disliked and disagreed with feminism that is anti-male. On a personal level, I find traditional gender roles to be more relaxing, and conducive to a harmonious home life.

I feel that some damage has been done by pitting women against men instead of seeing them as compliments. This is what this ad is all about to me.
You're not alone, Raya. A recent article in the British press confirmed that this feeling is true for many women.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1251873/What-women-want-2010-A-husband-wholl-main-breadwinner.html?ITO=1490

It's really quite encouraging. Here are the choicest excerpts:

What women want in 2010: A husband who'll be the main breadwinner

By Beth Hale
18th February 2010

Young mothers are turning their backs on high-powered careers to raise their children, a study has found.

Their mothers, or even grandmothers, lived through a time when women fought for full-time work and better pay.

But today's generation is returning to the traditional values of home and family - and looking to men to be the breadwinners.

By far the biggest leap came when women were asked whether they agreed that men and women should have different roles.

...Sociologist Geoff Dench Dench said: 'Women with young children are going back to the very traditional division of labour in which they want the husband as the breadwinner.

He said there had been a gradual move back towards 'more positive evaluations of women's traditional "work" in the family and informal community'.

He said evidence pointed to the group fuelling the switch being young mothers aged 18 to 34 - the same age as their mothers were when they fought for the right to work on a par with men.

'They are rocking against the Baby Boom generation, in many cases their own parents,' he added. 'Just as young women led the movement into higher levels of paid work, it seems to be young women who are leading a return to more traditional values.'

The analysis follows a report from a prominent liberal commentator which also revealed that far from wanting to be 'superwomen who manage everything, plus a high-profiled career', many women just want to be stay-at-home mothers with their husbands taking the role of breadwinner.

Cristina Odone, a former deputy editor of the New Statesman and editor of the Catholic Herald, said millions of women had been left frustrated and miserable by Government policies that push them back into jobs and their children into nurseries.
How exciting to see the younger generation embracing "a return to more traditional values." Having seen first-hand the ruinous consequences of feminism, the coming generation has realized that the timeless beliefs about men and women were sound, and are seeking to recapture the healthier relationships of the past. Let's hope that this trend continues.