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View Full Version : Stop the lies - hire bigger models


Meredith
17th May 2010, 06:18
You know that things are bad when both the plus-size industry and the straight-size industry have something in common. In this case, it's the appalling fact that they are both hiring models who are so skinny that they have to be artificially distorted to appear curvier.

In the straight-size category, one magazine is getting a good deal of flak for turning an anorexic-looking size-0 model into a size 4:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/7728242/Health-food-magazine-airbrush-fattens-up-skinny-model.html

There are two major reasons why this is so appalling, and they're both spelled out in the article:

the use of such retouching in a health magazine will raise concerns that the magazine industry is simply ignoring the "size-zero" issue.

"When magazines start changing body shape, it becomes unhealthy. They are not acting responsibly. That girl probably should have been sent home from the shoot – she's supposed to be representing a 'healthy' magazine as their cover girl and they retouched her to make her look healthier. It's false."

"When she did arrive, there were plenty of clothes that we couldn't put on her because her bones stuck out too much. She looked...really thin and unwell.
Bingo. And the second, more important point:

Eleni Renton, the director of Leni's Model Management, said that retouching photographs to make models appear larger was "crazy". She said: "Rather than take a chance on a different size model who actually fits the criteria for a shoot, it's much easier for magazine editors and casting directors to book a girl who is a known quantity in the industry, even if she might be slightly too slim or large for a job, and then retouch her later.
That is the truly disgusting part. This is the industry's stupidity and irresponsibility. Here's a client that actually needs a fuller-figured model - which is what everyone in the public wants, and everyone who reads this magazine wants. The magazine itself even realizes this. But instead of doing the sane and productive thing - which is to hire a model who is fuller-figured - no, they book an anorexic and digitally pretend that she is not.

So the sick-looking model who should be in a hospital gets work, while healthier models, the models who look the way that they're supposed to look (and without any digital manipulation) DON'T get the job.

This is insane.


Now, here's where things go from bad to worse. The same problem exists in plus-size fashion. Everyone has, I'm sure, seen this article about the Ford agency:

http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/fashion/article7115562.ece

The video shows some nice clips of Tara Lynn (and also shows that Crystal Renn is not even faux-plus anymore. She really is now a straight-size model, following the Sophie Dahl route). But the important point in the article is this:

The reporter notes that the models

tell me that they are often asked to look even bigger (when I say bigger, what I really mean is f**ter, but it’s one of those words that we will tiptoe around all afternoon). They’re supplied with padding to plump up hips, “chicken cutlets” to stuff into bras.
For the love of heaven. It's the same falsehood.

Plus-size customers want to see fuller-figured models. Everyone is sick of faux-plus models. So what do the clients and agencies do? Instead of hiring and representing true plus-size models - the very fuller-figured girls that the public is asking for - it takes smaller models and tries to make them look bigger.

This is insane. The solution is so obvious, and it's staring both parts of the industry right in the face:

Just hire (and represent) fuller-figured models.

It's what the public wants. It's even what the industry itself recognizes as a desire (based on the fact that it keeps artificially enlarging the figures of its too-thin models).

Stop the lies. Just book bigger models.

HSG
22nd November 2010, 09:56
Plus-size customers want to see fuller-figured models. Everyone is sick of faux-plus models. So what do the clients and agencies do? Instead of hiring and representing true plus-size models - the very fuller-figured girls that the public is asking for - it takes smaller models and tries to make them look bigger.

This is insane. Stop the lies. Just book bigger models.
It truly is an appalling situation. One can hardly think of a more blatant case of size discrimination.

The fact that agencies and clients pad up faux-size models clearly indicates that they realize that the public wants to see larger girls. That's conclusive. So why not do the logical thing and hire bigger models?

The depth of the anti-plus bigotry is jaw-dropping. Even when they admit that their current models are too thin (by padding them), they <i>still</I> refuse to use bigger girls, and instead falsify the truth, using deceit to pretend that their thin models are larger than they are.

What are they afraid of? What are they shunning? Are they so aesthetically biased against visible fullness that they cannot accept the (beautiful) sight of plump facial features and fleshy limbs? If so, they why are the individuals who feel this way working in plus-size fashion at all?

Anyone who doesn't like the sight of visible fullness and discriminates against it should be operating in the straight-size part of the industry. There, while such curve-o-phobia is still repugnant, at least it is to be expected.

But for goodness' sake, at least let's have a <i>plus-size</I> industry governed by individuals who <i>like</i> the plus aesthetic; no, who <i>love</I> the plus aesethetic. At least in the plus-size industry, let's have individuals who <i>prefer</I> opulent features and champion genuinely curvaceous models. That's what the public is asking for--not padded faux-plus models, but goddesses whose bountiful proportions are due to natural fullness, who show sensual weight in all of their features.

If the <i>plus-size</I> industry won't celebrate the visible signs of well-fed beauty, then how are full-figured women ever going to recognize their own attractiveness and consider themselves worthy of investing money in fashion for themselves, rather than skimping on disposable garments and bankrupting themselves on starvation-and-torture regimens?

It's time to break through the glass ceiling (or glass window) of size in the full-figured fashion industry, and to celebrate truly bountiful womanly beauty.

Size-28 stunner Rosie Mercado, the Figure of Fashion.<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/rm/rm52a.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/rm/rm52.jpg" target="_blank">Click to view larger</a>