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View Full Version : Banned Lane Bryant ad wins top prize


Chad
28th January 2011, 16:50
According to a news release (http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ames-declare-zimmerman-advertising-best-in-north-america-114801879.html) today, Lane Bryant's famous lingerie ad of 2010, which was banned by the major TV networks, has received the nation's top advertising award:

Zimmerman Advertising is proud to accept the Platinum Trophy for Lane Bryant's "Not What Mom Had in Mind" campaign, recognizing it as the very best in North America.

The controversial ad featuring a buxom, plus-sized model in her bra and panties spawned a deluge of free publicity. The video was linked to hundreds of news stories and blogs, garnering more than 2.3 million views in just one week, and making it the number one viral video in the country. The idea was, sexy doesn't just come in one size and America responded in a big way.

"We knew that this campaign would resonate with America, we just never could have guessed how much," added Zimmerman. "But, we're not just pushing for brand awareness here, we're pushing to trigger a change..."
The moral of the story? Plus-size beauty sells. Note in particular that the model in the ad, Ashley Graham, is a size 16. That should prompt all the companies using disappointing size-10/12 models (let alone minus-size girls) to rethink their anti-plus booking policies.

The company recently released the following video about the process of producing and marketing the Lane Bryant ad, and about the ensuing controversy:

<object width="550" height="437"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/pMefHELX9bw?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/pMefHELX9bw?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="550" height="437"></embed></object>

The video offers an interesting analysis of how such a campaign is launched and promoted, describing advertising concepts and techniques to which the public is usually not privy. It makes me glad that I'm not in advertising (because some of the efforts seem so...calculated), but thankful that for once, the power of the media was used to benefit full-figured curves rather than attack them, as is usually the case.


In case you don't recall, here's the ad itself, which was initially discussed in this (http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=1844) thread last year:

<object width="680" height="407"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/VMxyZQfMmM4?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/VMxyZQfMmM4?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="680" height="407"></embed></object>

And here's the equally wonderful follow-up, an attack on pro-anorexic fashion, which a different company released as a protest against the networks' censorship of curves (initially discussed here (http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=1905)).

<object width="680" height="407"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_R9oG49INm4?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_R9oG49INm4?fs=1&amp; hl=en_US&amp;rel=0&amp;color1=0x3a3a3a&amp;color2=0x 999999" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="680" height="407"></embed></object>