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Graham
6th February 2011, 19:51
One of the things that I enjoy on this forum is the occasional reference (http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=1864) to what the male equivalent of the Judgment of Paris would be. Just as this site celebrates traditional femininity, so does it occasionally reference, for counterpoint, expressions of traditional masculinity.

Given that today, the idea of what a "man" is seems to have devolved into sitting around a television watch some overpaid adolescents hurl a ball around, I thought I'd share a story that gives a better idea of traditional masculinity.

In India, a retired Gurkha soldier is being hailed as a hero after he single-handedly stopped 40 criminals on a train who were raping a girl in front of her parents and looting the passengers. He killed three of them, wounded eight, and drove the rest off.

He was armed with nothing but his knife and his courage.

One man against 40, and he won.

Here's the story:

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index.php?action=news_details&news_id=27100

And the run-down of what happened:

Lone Nepali Gorkha who subdued 40 train robbers

MANOJ ADHIKARI/SANTOSH POKHAREL

POKHARA, Jan 13: Gorkha soldiers have long been known the world over for their valor, and these khukuri-wielding warriors winning the British many a battle have become folklore.

A retired Indian Gorkha soldier recently revisited those glory days when he thwarted 40 robbers, killing three of them and injuring eight others, with his khukuri [knife] during a train journey. He is in line to receive three gallantry awards from the Indian government.

Bishnu Shrestha of Baidam made good use of his khukuri to save the chastity of a girl and hundreds of thousands in loot.

The band of about 40 robbers, some of whom were travelling as passengers, stopped the train in the Chittaranjan jungles in West Bengal around midnight.

“They started snatching jewelry, cell phones, cash, laptops and other belongings from the passengers,” Shrestha recalled. The soldier had somehow remained a silent spectator amidst the melee, but not for long. He had had enough when the robbers stripped an 18-year-old girl sitting next to him and tried to rape her right in front of her parents. He then took out his khukuri and took on the robbers.

He took one of the robbers under control and then started to attack the others. He said the rest of the robbers fled after he killed three of them with his khukuri and injured eight others.

“They had carried out their robbery with swords, blades and pistols. The pistols may have been fake as they didn't open fire,” he surmised.

Police arrested the eight injured dacoits and recovered around 400,000 Indian rupees in cash, 40 gold necklaces, 200 cell phones, 40 laptops and other items that the fleeing robbers dropped in the train.

Police escorted Shrestha to the Railways Hospital after the rescued girl told them about his heroic deed. Mainstream Indian media carried the story.

“Fighting the enemy in battle is my duty as a soldier; taking on the dacoits in the train was my duty as a human being,” said the Indian army nayak.

He still finds it hard to believe that he took on 40 armed robbers alone. “They may have feared that more of my army friends were traveling with me and fled after fighting me for around 20 minutes,” he explained.
Can you imagine? He fought them for 20 minutes (!), single-handed, armed with nothing but his knife, while they were brandishing "swords, blades and pistols." Only later did he conclude that the pistols were fake, so he must have gone into the battle expecting to die. But he felt compelled to defend the girl's honour.

This, by the way, is what a kukri looks like - the knife that the Gurkha used to defeat the brigands. It's practically a short sword.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2exaved.jpg

Even the terminology in the article is marvellously chivalric, when it speaks of the Gurkhas as being known for their "valor," and describing how this soldier saved the girl's "chastity." When was the last time that people even recognized such noble concepts as valor in men, and chastity in women? When such values dominated a society, it was a much healthier culture, a time when men such as this Gurkha were the norm, not the exception.

Karsten
6th February 2011, 23:26
Another article comes with a picture of the fellow. Interestingly, he's no steroid-fuelled hulk, but rather a wiry soldier with a traditional moral code and an indomitable will.

http://xnepali.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/bishnushresthabravegorkhaarmy.jpg

He remind me of Manfred von Richthofen, the "Red Baron," another slight fellow, who was the greatest pilot of WWI and brought down a record 80 Allied planes, all to defend his Prussian fatherland.

The article comes with a terse account of the incident:

http://xnepali.com/a-gurkha-soldier-who-fought-40-train-robbers-to-be-felicitated-in-the-republic-day-of-india/

While in the train, Maurya Express from Ranchi to Gorakhpur, on September 2, 2010, 35 year-old Bishnu saved a girl about to be raped by the train robbers in front of her helpless parents. After looting the train, when the robbers started to strip a 18 year old girl in front of him, he couldn’t contain his calmness. He took out his khukari and took on the a group of 40 robbers, alone. In the fight, he killed three of dacoits and injured eight others. Remaining dacoits fled the scene to save their lives.
Nicely put - "fled to save their lives." He acted as a Teutonic Knight once would have: with honour.

What a difference from the simpering modern metrosexuals who pervade today's media.

Chad
7th February 2011, 01:06
This, by the way, is what a kukri looks like - the knife that the Gurkha used to defeat the brigands. It's practically a short sword.
That image, and this whole story, reminds me of the well-known scene from Crocodile Dundee in which the title character has to defend his feminine, soft-featured sweetheart from a group of street thugs.

Here's the clip if you've forgotten it (or, heaven forfend, if you've never seen the movie).

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Obviously the circumstances in the film are reduced to PG palatability, whereas the incident with the Gurkha was deadly serious and a life-threatening, real-world scenario. However, for what it's worth, the storyline of the film (<a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00005N5SA/thejudgmenofpari">Crocodile Dundee</a>, I mean) has the girl making a choice between Dundee - a nobly archaic man from another time - and a limp-wristed contemporary metrosexual type. Needless to say, the Gurkha incident shows the benefit of opting for the pre-feminist type of real man; not a "macho" caricature, but a latter-day knight of strong character.