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Kaitlynn
2nd December 2005, 12:19
There was a bit of celebrity fluff yesterday about how Mary-Kate Olsen claims to have beaten anorexia, and is going to "get rid of her skinny wardrobe."

http://www.contactmusic.com/new/xmlfeed.nsf/mndwebpages/healthy%20mary-kate%20gives%20away%20her%20skinny%20clothes

Now, Mary-Kate + 15lbs is still a walking skeleton, but I think there is a good point here. When anyone blossoms from underweight to curvaceous, or from curvaceous to luscious, I think doing something like this is a really good idea.

Apart from the basic "good deed" of donating clothing, I think it helps you think more positively about yourself. Instead of missing an old dress or top, you can look forward to all the exciting new clothes you can buy, at a more voluptuous, more attractive, more womanly size.

Plus, since fashion is so much more feminine today, chances are all the new things you get will be sexier anyway.

Here's some of the text of the article:

...............................

Actress MARY-KATE OLSEN is celebrating beating her eating disorder by giving away clothes that no longer fit her.

After gaining almost 15 pounds (6.8 kilograms), the socialite is convinced the eating disorder she battled for almost a year in 2004 is a thing of the past.

And, according to American magazine In Touch, she's so happy with her new-found curves, she has decided to keep the weight on and get rid of her skinny wardrobe.

A source tells the magazine the 19-year-old recently donated thousands of dollars worth of designer clothes to West Hollywood, California thrift store.......

kirsten
2nd December 2005, 18:40
Although Mary-Kate Olsen is still a mere slip of a girl, this is a good example to follow. Too many people hold on to clothes that don't fit in order to conform to media notions about size, but it's far, far better for a woman to find clothes that accentuate her beauty as she is, curves and all.

HSG
3rd December 2005, 13:09
<br>When a goddess frees herself of restrictive clothing from her underweight days, she should not see it as any kind of loss (which is isn't), but rather, think, "Good riddance" to the old attire. Her new, more womanly size gives her a splendid opportunity to assemble a wardrobe that plays up the desirability of her new-found curves. Fashion is indeed far more feminine today than it was even a few seasons ago, and many current pieces (figure-revealing dresses, embellished camisoles, tiered/flared skirts, etc., etc.) are tailor-made to play up the attractions of generous proportions.

At a fuller size, a voluptuous vixen can choose more alluring apparel, and wear it better, than she ever could at a diminished size. It's a win-win situation, in every respect.

And incidentally, since Christmas is almost upon us, ladies should remember that there is no privilege that is dearer to a suitor's heart than the opportunity to shower his darling with gifts. And in the case of a new wardrobe, he even enjoys the reciprocal benefit of seeing his adored one looking gorgeous in it.

Christina Schmidt modelling a demure social dress for Torrid, Winter 2005:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/torrid14.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.torrid.com/store/product.asp?LS=0&M=213856548&RN=206&ITEM=583335" target="_blank">Click here to view the item in full</a>

Kristina
4th December 2005, 00:40
Love that dress on Christina! I can't wait to get rid of MY "skinny" clothes. At a size 10 I am someone the popular culture thinks should really start to diet, but I'd much rather resemble a fertility goddess. I know people on this board will understand!