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View Full Version : Myths and hoaxes, bought & paid for


M. Lopez
7th December 2005, 15:33
I know the preference here is to avoid discussing all of the endless media hysteria about weight-related myths and hoaxes, but a new book just came out today today that I think deserves notice, because it blows the lid off a lot of the lies that the public is being given on this topic:

Here's the link to the press release (http://www.obesitymyths.com/news.cfm?rid=135)

In some of the most important relevations the book contains, it:


-"highlights the government’s reliance on pharmaceutical and weight-loss industry input to lower the bar for being “overweight.” "

-"reveals that much of what the public has been told concerning [weight] comes from financially conflicted researchers who have taken money from the weight-loss industry. These conflicted researchers have been instrumental in offering many of the false claims and much of the hype associated with [weight] today."

-"even the measure used by the federal government to establish overweight and *******—the Body Mass Index (BMI), a simple measure of height and weight—has been heavily influenced by weight-loss industry-funded researchers."

-"exposes the covert effort by the $46 billion weight-loss industry to quietly nurture overblown rhetoric in an effort to panic the public about carrying a few extra pounds. Pharmaceutical and weight-loss companies have invested millions of dollars in institutes, researchers, and studies—all squarely aimed at hyping the supposed ills of being overweight."


So basically, 90% of the media is just one big diet ad, all of which the weight-loss industry has paid for, either directly (in its promos), or indirectly, by having reporters treat their propaganda as if it were "news."

HSG
7th December 2005, 18:23
<br>This topic is indeed perpetually distasteful, and one wishes that common sense would prevail, and that the entire discussion would disappear. Even to engage in a debate such as this offers the "other side" an appearance of credibility (no matter how preposterous their lies actually are, at a time when people are living longer than ever before).

And how could anyone regard the possibility that young women may finally be shedding their compulsion to starve, and instead embracing their naturally curvaceous figures, as anything other than <i>wonderful</i>?

However, since so many figures in authority--legislators, educators, etc.--have proved to be astonishingly susceptible to media brainwashing, and have set their policies accordingly, books such as these are regrettably quite necessary.

There is a tremendous irony about the mass media's part in promoting curve-o-phobia. The press envisions itself (and promotes itself) as a "public protector," a "whistleblower" on corporate manipulation, and on the abuse of the capitalist system. And yet in <i>this</i> instance, when the misery wrought by weight-loss profiteers is so blatant, when their manipulation of the public trust is so obvious, when an industry is so obviously causing needless physical suffering for North American women, the media not only turns a blind eye, but is even <i>complicit</i> in the practice, aiding and abetting the very worst form of corporate exploitation.

Never have the "situational ethics" of the media been so apparent. And undoubtedly, it is all undertaken because many members of the media share the thin-supremacist mindset that the weight-control industry promotes.<p><center>* * *</center><p>Still, <i>aesthetics</i> remain the best argument against diet-industry attempts at destroying feminine beauty. Just look at this enchanting new image of Barbara at Nordstrom, in a princess-like garment that seems like something out of a dream vision. It is one of the most timeless and feminine pieces that we have ever seen in the modern day, and particularly appropriate for a goddess who possesses the soft fullness of the Classical ideal.

Even the most pernicious lies are powerless against the Truth of beauty.<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/bb/bn36.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://store.nordstrom.com/product/product.asp?StyleID=2878250&Category=2376776%7E2374327%7E6002274%7E2382059&ProductFinder=True&pfindid=13" target="_blank">Click here to view this splendid item</a>

Kristina
8th December 2005, 01:25
Yay, another 'curves are beautiful' book!! :D Barbara simply glows.

Emily
9th December 2005, 13:51
I can't even express how beautiful Barbara looks in that top. It's like something one might find in a forgotten closet -- a creation of Victorian fantasy. In its delicate femininity, it adorns Barbara's lush, sumptuous figure perfectly.

I could see it being worn with a skirt instead, though, and perhaps (if one were daring), with a slightly more revealing piece underneath -- even a midriff-baring top. The gauzy top would add just a hint of almost-modesty, to create a very sensual look.