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View Full Version : Fashion students designing for plus sizes


Meredith
17th January 2012, 12:16
A thread (http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=2173) on last year's forum described how students at British fashion schools were going to be directed to use plus-size models and plus-size mannequins as part of their instruction.

A new BBC article article highlights an Edinburgh fashion school which is the first that is adopting this approach.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-16594884

The text is succinct:

Fashion students in Edinburgh have become the first in the UK to start designing clothes for larger ladies.

The move is part of a campaign to encourage the fashion industry to think again about its notions of body shape and beauty.

Usually students would only work with size 10 models.

Now they have been told it is time to embrace the fuller figure.
How encouraging that the report identifies size 10 as not being a plus size. The original reports stated that the students would be working with U.K. size 18s (i.e., Sophie Sheppard's size), so this development is a genuine step forward, in that the understanding of a "plus size" will be one that is authentically full figured.

The report comes with a video showing the students in action. They seem to be fully enjoying the experience. Their creativity is certainly not being stifled, but flourishing.


<object width="690" height="423"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/nlWhgWWFjOM?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/nlWhgWWFjOM?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="690" height="423" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

This is a truly groundbreaking step. Having the students acclimatized to working with larger bodies at this stage will keep their thinking from ossifying into thin-centric limitations. Ideally, these students will go on to use plus-size models in their runway shows, in their advertising when they field collections, and ultimately, in the promotion of their labels.

Better still, this experience might make them advocates of plus-size beauty in the fashion world at whatever level they end up influencing it, and they will be able to dismiss pernicious fictions such as "clothes look better on emaciated frames," because their own experience would have disproven such myths.