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Hannah
4th April 2012, 11:25
Despite the fact that the Indian film industry has a longstanding tradition of featuring curvier actresses than one sees in Western films, one hears little about the plus-size fashion industry in India, at least in English news sources.

This article provides a welcome corrective, introductin a number of the brands that operate on the Indian subcontinent.

http://www.fashionunited.in/news/fashion/the-plus-size-story-gets-bigger-and-better-040420123383

Among the labels listed is one called "aLL by Pantaloons" (Pantaloons being a major retail chain in India, and "aLL" [sic] being its plus-size line.

The label has a Facebook tab (http://www.facebook.com/pantaloons/app_271170259575506) as a subdivision of the Pantallons page, and it also has a. pdf e-catalogue:

http://www.pantaloonretail.in/pdf/aLL-E-catalogue.pdf

The model is quite beautiful. In some of the images such looks fuller-figured, in some less so, but it's wonderful to see a photogenic plus-size model representing a major brand in India.

In this picture she looks genuinely plus-size.

http://i43.tinypic.com/1zv9afn.jpg

A close-up shows a soft curve under her chin.

http://i43.tinypic.com/2ekhl6o.jpg

Larger: http://i42.tinypic.com/e6akqg.jpg


This top bears an attractive print.

http://i39.tinypic.com/vskwas.jpg

Larger: http://i39.tinypic.com/21eor3s.jpg


Showing off her shapely legs:

http://i44.tinypic.com/29zu7aa.jpg

Larger: http://i43.tinypic.com/2d2eoae.jpg


Looking adorable:

http://i41.tinypic.com/4j85l1.jpg

Larger: http://i41.tinypic.com/fmj31v.jpg


This is a very pretty look, very feminine:

http://i43.tinypic.com/2eby33o.jpg

Larger: http://i40.tinypic.com/29eorhg.jpg


Indian labels often categorize their clothing as either "Indian" or "Western." If the former outfit was Western, this is more traditionally Indian. The model displays both equally well.

http://i40.tinypic.com/34j40zl.jpg

Larger: http://i42.tinypic.com/t87s5z.jpg

It's always a pleasure to see plus-size fashion exhibiting a presence across the globe. I hope we see more of this plus-size model, and that the Indian full-figured fashion industry will grow and develop.

Luminosa
4th April 2012, 17:12
I would like to thank Hannah for posting these photographs of the lovely Indian model. I appreciate the global perspective, and it is a reminder that plus-size beauty can be found in all cultures around the world.

Karsten
17th April 2012, 13:54
Speaking of the Indian approach to curves, I remember reading a thread (http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=1702) on the forum a few seasons ago about an Indian actress who deliberately gained weight for a historical epic, in order to conform to the fuller-figured beauty ideal of the time.

In a new interview, she specifically identifies the underweight standard as "a Western concept," in contrast to the Indian tradition of plus-size beauty.

http://www.digitalspy.ca/bollywood/news/a376642/zarine-khan-size-zero-is-a-western-concept.html

The pertinent comment:

She told The Times of India: "I love Kareena [Kapoor] but for me, size zero was never in. She looks amazing with more weight on her. Indian women have always been full-bodied and men like voluptuous women. Size zero is a concept of the West and it is only meant for the runway models, not for us."
It's wonderful to see that people in other cultures can celebrate an appreciation for full-figured femininity as an indigenous aspect of their own heritage and a part of their ethno-nationalist identity.

However, of course, size zero is not actually a "concept of the West" at all. The Western tradition of beauty, from the Greeks through the 19th century, was every bit as full-bodied as the Indian ideal.

The real opposition is traditionalism versus modernity. All cultural and ethnic traditions revere plus-size womanhood. The alien ideologies of modernity are the culprits for imposing the artificial, androgynous standard.

Paradoxical as it may see, the West has been colonized by these ideologies as much as any other part of the world has been. But if we in the West could reconnect to our own sundry ethnic heritages, whether Nordic or Celtic or what have you, we too would be able to view our own traditions as a preferable aesthetic ideal to the modern standard.