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View Full Version : Fashion industry kills 14 year old (article)


Meredith
21st July 2012, 10:05
In a damning indictment, a coroner has directly linked a young girl's tragic weight-related suicide to the fashion industry and the emaciated standard that it imposes on society.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jun/20/fiona-geraghty-inquest-fashion-industry

Says the article:

Fiona Geraghty inquest: fashion industry blamed for girl's death

Coroner says industry should stop using very thin models after schoolgirl suffering from eating disorder hanged herself

20 June 2012

A coroner has blamed the fashion industry for the death of a schoolgirl found hanged after becoming convinced she was overweight.

Michael Rose, the West Somerset coroner, linked the death of 14-year-old Fiona Geraghty directly to the industry and called on magazines and model agencies to stop using very thin models.

Recording a verdict of misadventure, Rose attacked the fashion world. "The one class of person not here who I hold directly responsible for what happened is the fashion industry," he said.

"The problems of eating disorders amongst young people, particularly girls, did not exist before the 1970s. From that period onwards the fashion industry and the magazines promoted thin models and the thin figure.

"I do ask, particularly the magazines in the fashion industry, to stop publishing photographs of wafer thin girls. I do implore it, because at the end of the day for their benefit, families like this must suffer. It is, I am afraid, an increasing problem and until they control themselves it will continue."
It's very welcome to see someone in a position of significance identifying the direct link between the fashion industry's androgyny-pushing propaganda and the ruined lives, even deaths, of young women.

A follow-up article in the Telegraph, penned by a former fashion-mag editor, confirms the coroner's assertions.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/9350904/Teenage-bulimia-and-the-warped-world-of-fashion-magazines.html

She too is unsparing in speaking the truth about this ugly industry:

Behind the glossy front covers, fashion shoots and aspirational advertising campaigns lies a dark world that is anything but glamorous – and it is this world that is distorting the way a generation of young girls and women view themselves.

I have worked on a woman’s fashion magazine and have first-hand experience of the warped approach that many of those in the industry have towards what they consider to be “normal” when it comes to size and beauty.

At times, the managing editor..was so worried about the weight and health of a model she would try to raise the issue with the fashion director.

Invariably, that girl would be his favourite model and the one he wanted for the shoot. Normally he would get his own way.

The various international editors of Vogue recently announced with much fanfare that they had drawn up a “health pact”, agreeing not to use models under the age of 16 or those they “believed” to have an eating disorder.

To my mind that pact is not worth the designer notepaper it was probably typed on.
The last point is especially damning. Vogue made a big press event claiming that it would no longer use underweight models. Has anything changed? Have the magazines been using fuller-figured girls?

Of course not. It was all just empty hype, at attempt to silence justified criticism of their sociopathic, criminal casting decisions.

As this case shows, the fashion industry's toxic, underweight standard directly causes death in young women. It's long past time for such a fatal distortion of female appearance to be curbed, once and for all.

Lily
23rd July 2012, 10:36
And this just happens to be one such case that's reported. Just think of the thousands, tens of thousand of girls who nearly die, or who do in fact die, due to the media-fuelled starvation standard.

We all know anorexia is potentially fatal, but any form of dieting, any weight loss, is an eating disorder. Any restriction on food is an eating disorder. The diet-starvation peddlers like to draw an arbitrary line between anorexia and dieting, but they're the same thing.

Here's the case of another young girl who nearly lost her life trying to follow the media's emaciated standard. In her case, a diet-starvation company was not only directly responsible for her illness, but actually praised her for nearly killing herself.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2175283/Schoolgirl-entered-Slimmer-Year-contest-anorexic-getting-hooked-losing-weight.html

The pertinent text:

A schoolgirl slimmer was left seriously ill - because she couldn’t stop dieting.

Lucy Hemms, 18...became addicted to dieting and restricted herself to just 200 calories a day - the equivalent of two bananas.

Lucy today told how her hair dropped out, she started suffering from arthritis and she developed 'old people’s' skin.

Lucy said: 'I was weighing myself six times a day - I started dieting and couldn’t stop.

Lucy started dieting at 15 after being bullied about being 14 stone while she was studying for her GCSE examinations.

'My skin was bad like a much older person and I got arthritis in my ankles. My hair fell out and I had to wear a wig for a long time'.

Mother Jillian, 48, said: 'I thought I was going to lose my daughter...It was the worst time of my life too - I just couldn’t pull her out of her obsession. I really thought she might die.
Lucy is fortunate that she didn't die -- unlike the girl in Meredith's article, who did lose her life.

It's horrifying. Bravo to Lucy for acknowledging the media's part in creating this toxic, anti-plus environment:

Lucy believes teenagers are pressurised into being thin by images of models in magazines and on TV.
The sickest part, though, is the fact that the diet company that was behind Lucy's self-imposed starvation actually applauded her for nearly killing herself. If she had died, this would be considered a criminal act -- causing loss of life:

She was praised by the slimming company for her 'healthy weight loss'.
Imagine the mentality of this pernicious industry, which literally interprets nearly starving to death as a "healthy" act.

It's beyond madness. It's as if a smoking company would praise a girl who developed cancer for developing a "healthy tumor." No one would permit such grotesque practices -- yet diet-starvation companies get away with it.