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View Full Version : Dieting alters brain chemistry (article)


M. Lopez
28th December 2005, 10:14
I hope that by now, everyone realizes just how self-destructive dieting can be. And not just excessive dieting. ANY dieting. That point is made in the following article, which reminds the reader how eating disorders and weight loss can ruin a girl's life:

http://www.newsok.com/article/1716260/

The point that really got me was when one of the researchers revealed that dieting actually changes a girl's brain chemistry (yikes!), leaving her susceptible to eating disorders. I suppose most people suspected this anyway, but it's still a shock to know that this has been medically confirmed.

Here is the most important section:


"Since the late 1960s, the beauty norm has changed dramatically.

Marilyn Monroe's voluptuous figure soon was replaced by Twiggy's gaunt frame as the beauty ideal. An increase in eating disorders soon followed.

Research indicates some people have a genetic vulnerability that can kick-start an eating disorder when their brain chemistry is altered by dieting, he said.

"Genetics loads the gun and environment pulls the trigger. A girl with a tendency for eating disorders might think she wants to lose a few pounds, then it spins out of control before she realizes it," Johnson said.

Eating disorder sufferers typically are overachievers who put forth a false self and try to live up to a ridiculous ideal, Johnson said. They've lost perspective and are driven by unreasonable thoughts. "

Emily
28th December 2005, 21:44
"Eating disorder sufferers typically are overachievers who put forth a false self...They've lost perspective and are driven by unreasonable thoughts."[/I]
This is another important point that the article makes, and it fits in with some of the discussions that have appeared on this forum recently. I suspect there is a close tie between self-inducted starvation and over-exercise, and the androgynous "work ethic" that has been imposed on women in the past several decades. It especially affects women who are "driven to succeed," and who end up living that stressed-out lifestyle. And of course, these same women then end up criticizing anyone who doesn't share their values, either in terms of personal aesthetics, or life choices.

I have no doubt that most female magazine editors/writers and media power-brokers fall into this category -- and thanks to their profession, they seek (either deliberately, or without reflection) to impose their standards on the rest of society, to the detriment of everyone.

Sadly, it also determines which models they book -- that is, those who physically embody their anti-feminine mantra.