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View Full Version : ''Changing the Threshold of Beauty''


HSG
13th April 2014, 12:38
<br>In a recent <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=2643" target="_blank">post</a>, Emily noted the valiant efforts of one photographer to replace numerous ads and billboards across Paris that reflect the crass, levelling values of the modern world with images of classical works of art that celebrate the aristocratic beauty ideals of past eras.

We recently learned of another notable enterprise in a similar vein: a <a href="http://laraklopp.wordpress.com/2014/04/09/weekly-photo-challenge-changing-the-threshold-of-beauty/" target="_blank">proposal</a> by one Lara Klopp (who describes herself as an "art teacher; student of web design and development; artist; mom; wife; kinda frugal; always wanting to try new things") to decorate that ubiquitous symbol of mass transportation, the humble urban bus, with images of timeless feminine beauty.

Both sides of the vehicle would feature the project's slogan, <i>"Beauty Through the Ages . . . One Size Does Not Fit All."</I> One side would exhibt Titian's painting, <i><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/pinacotheca/titian07-6.htm" target="_blank">Venus and the Lute Player</a></i> (c.156570), which famously hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and is one of the finest images of full-figured femininity ever created.<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject03.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject03a.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>Lara Klopp's rendition would enthusiastically preserve the most size-celebratory feature of Titian's masterpiece, the opulent fullness at the model's rounded middle, a sight so sensual and gorgeous that no man looking at a goddess so amply proportioned could possibly resist her.<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject03.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject03b.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>As the viewer can see by comparing the bus rendition to the original, Lara Klopp has understandably depicted Venus in a somewhat more modest fashion than did Titian, by draping fabric across her bust. Regardless, in both images it is the sight of the well-fed goddess's soft, swelling midsection that is the point of greatest allure. <p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/pinacotheca/titian07-6.htm" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/pinacotheca/titian/titian07-6.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>Lara Klopp's graphic depicting the opposite side of the bus includes the proposed dimensions of the vehicle and features a different image of plus-size beauty, a 19th-century photograph titled "Reclining Young Woman with Skull" (albeit with the skull itself notably absent).<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject01a.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>Whereas the Titian artwork depicts the sumptuous fullness of a curvaceous beauty's waist, this image highlights the seductiveness of her generous reverse-view contours. Both images notably depict their goddesses in recumbent repose, for voluptuous vixens are never so alluring as when they are depicted in languorous states of sensual indolence, avoiding all exertion.<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject01b.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>The <a href="http://bit.ly/1n4z6US" target="_blank">original</a> picture (shot in black and white but colour tinted, as were many 19th-century photographs) does include a skull, as if the model were anticipating the skeletal appearance that the Aesthetics of Guilt would impose on women a century later, yet maintaining her sang-froid in the face of it, confident in the superior beauty of her own well-fed form.<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject04f.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject04g.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>The rear of the bus would direct onlookers to the works of several Old Masters and, in an unbidden nod to this Web site (for which we are most grateful), would prompt them to visit The Judgment of Paris.<p><center><a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject02.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/gallery/busproject02.jpg" border="0" title="Click to enlarge" alt="Click to enlarge"></a></center><p>A bus decorated in this manner would be a magnificent mobile delivery device propagating the aesthetic restoration. It would expose more of the public to the true form of feminine beauty, which is otherwise assiduously suppressed in our Cultural Marxist society. It would turn one of the staple features of the modern world against itself, using advertising as a method of spreading healthy and positive rather than corrosive aesthetic values. And perhaps most importantly, it would offer a glimpse of that other world--that alternative world, that <i>better</I> world in which we would all be living, has the forces of regeneration not lost the conflicts of the 20th century but emerged victorious, and in so doing preserved the aristocratic values of true beauty that gave Western civilization form and purpose throughout its history.

(Click images to view larger)

- <a href="http://laraklopp.wordpress.com/2014/04/09/weekly-photo-challenge-changing-the-threshold-of-beauty/" target="_blank">Original post as Lara Klopp's web log</a>

Joey
14th April 2014, 04:39
How exciting! I truly hope this comes to fruition.. it would be so incredible to see a bus like that around the cities.