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MelanieW
9th April 2006, 06:12
Its a few weeks old, but I just found this positive article in which Rachel Weisz - who won an award at this years Oscars, and was pregnant at the time - says she refuses to diminish her figure, once she gives birth.

What I especially like here is that she directly links curves with femininity, as being exactly what defines a woman. When a woman reduces her curves, Weisz says, she is "dieting away what makes you a woman, your femininity".

If only more people realized this, both in Hollywood, and in the real world.

Heres the link:

http://www.postchronicle.com/news/entertainment/tittletattle/article_21210569.shtml

and the complete text, since its pretty short:


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Rachel Weisz Reprimands Women For Over-Working Their Bodies

by Mike Baron
Mar 16, 2006

Actress Rachel Weisz, who is pregnant with her first child, refuses to submit herself to industry expectations following the birth of her unborn child, and she has no intentions on dropping her feminine shape.

Rachel, who was dubbed 'Best Supporting Actress' for 'The Constant Gardener' and recieved an Academy Award on March 5 of this year ('06), strongly believes that women do not need to punish their bodies and health with severe and over-the-top diets or spend a ridiculous and tiresome amount of time in exercise programs or organizations to stay fit and look sexy.

The Oscar-winning actress says, "I think it's important not to succumb to those pressures."

"If you diet away your curves you are dieting away what makes you a woman, your femininity."

"I enjoy dressing up - almost all women do - but, really, you can do that without flagellating your body."

HSG
9th April 2006, 21:19
"If you diet away your curves you are dieting away what makes you a woman, your femininity."
It's always encouraging to hear celebrities making statement such as these, even if the speakers usually exhibit hardly a trace of the curves that they purport to champion. Such words would be far more effective coming from an actress who was genuinely full-figured.

Weisz's condemnation of exercise-torture, as well as of dieting-starvation, is most welcome. Both are equally harmful to feminine beauty.

It's interesting to note how often these pronouncements are associated with pregnancy. For many actresses, pregnancy may represent the first time in their lives when they have allowed themselves to acquire a womanly shape. And no matter how immersed they are in the Hollywood mindset, on some level these actresses must realize that with their newer, fuller proportions, they embody a more comfortable and natural form of womanhood than they did in their more emaciated incarnations.

Weisz's assertion that when a woman diminishes her figure, she is diminishing her femininity, is indisputable. How nice it would be if she and her peers followed this thinking through to the next logical step, and realized that when a woman <i>increases</i> her curves, she <i>gains</i> in femininity. The popular slogan, <i>"Sexy girls have dessert,"</i> reminds us of the size-celebratory fashion rule which maintains that more generous proportions are the best accessories of all.

They go with everything.

Lindsey Garbelman (size 14/16) modelling Aurora Formals, showing off the rich curves that are the very essence of feminine allure.<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/lindsey/aurora34.jpg"></center>