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View Full Version : H&M doesn't get it despite "effort"


Emeraldgems
15th June 2006, 08:48
Most of H&M's clothes ranges up to size 20/22. That I suppose is good news. The bad news is that even though I'm able to order it online the day a new piece of clothing is out in the shops, there's no guarantee that there'll be any left in my size or larger. The other bad news is that if it's a top, jacket, coat, or dress, there's no guarantee that it'll fit, even if I'm able to order it in my size.

H&M just don't get it! I read all the articles on this site when I first discovered it a few years ago and somewhere I read that it's not enough to just upscale a pattern from a size 6/8. It was such a positive boost to read what I'd been thinking and known for so long, but believed I was the only one who thought like that.

I don't think they'd lose any money if they hired a designer/design team that specialized in designing clothes that'll flatter the female figure. A Danish mail-order catalogue has already done that, but unfortunately, Ellos isn't much cheaper than what you can find in plus-size shops. But at least they understand that full-figured women aren't necessarily ashamed of their fuller figures, and of course we shouldn't be. They understand that we're proud and "normal" and should be perceived as such, and want to dress in feminine and curve-flattering styles. Unfortunately, I've not yet had the chance to buy any of their plus-size range to test its wear and quality.

The other regrettable thing is that all the dresses are full- length and pants are often extra length, when in fact there are many of us who are plus sized and not over 5'5".

HSG
26th July 2006, 15:06
at least they understand that full-figured women aren't necessarily ashamed of their fuller figures, and of course we shouldn't be. They understand that we're proud and "normal" and should be perceived as such, and want to dress in feminine and curve-flattering styles.

The other regrettable thing is that all the dresses are full- length and pants are often extra length, when in fact there are many of us who are plus sized and not over 5'5".
Both points are extremely important. The relative neglect of petite plus sizes extends beyond clothing manufacture, and even impacts marketing. It is astonishing that although the <i>median</i> (i.e., average) height of North American women is 5'4, plus-size petite fashions are still usually represented by models who stand 5'9 (or, at best, 5'8), and therefore do not display the clothing in the manner that it would actually appear on petite customers.

Plus-size fashions look perceptibly different on petite figures--<i>better,</i> in fact, because a petite height endows a model with a naturally curvy silhouette. There is no rationale whatsoever for favouring taller plus-size models over models who stand closer to women's average height. The only reason that this has been the practice up to now is due to the misguided application of straight-size-industry perceptions to the plus-size fashion industry.

Hopefully, retailers will finally put aside this kind of distorted thinking, and will begin designing more fashions expressly for petite customers--and most importantly, will begin displaying them on models who actually represent the median height of their customers.

Christina Schmidt turning up the heat at Torrid, Summer 2006:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/torrid26.jpg"></center>