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Emily
16th September 2006, 20:44
It seems that the Madrid decision to ban underweight models is already yielding results. It has suddenly grafted a backbone onto other governments around the world.

According to the following article,

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/16/AR2006091600431.html

the British government is considering following suit. Here's an excerpt:

A British Cabinet minister, meanwhile, called Saturday for London Fashion Week, also opening Monday, to follow Madrid's lead.

"The fashion industry's promotion of beauty as meaning stick thin is damaging to young girls' self image and to their health," Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell said in a statement. "Young girls aspire to look like the catwalk models _ when those models are unhealthily underweight it pressurizes girls to starve themselves to look the same."

Jowell gets it right -- the point is not whether each model herself has an eating disorder, but the pernicious influence that these androgynous images have on young women, and on the culture as a whole.

The article also notes that Madrid has now banned five models for being underweight. It wasn't just a bluff -- they stuck to their principles, and good for them for doing so.

MelanieW
17th September 2006, 04:06
I hope this means that the fashion world will finally move away from promoting androgyny, and start embracing womanly curves.

Crystal Renn is written up in the current issue of The Sunday Mirror in Britain, and thankfully, this time, she seems to be on the right side of the issue. This more than makes up for her disappointing comments on Showbiz Tonight. Given time to reflect, I hope she now realizes how much damage the fashion industry has done to young women over the years by imposing an underweight standard of appearance.

http://www.sundaymirror.co.uk/news/tm_objectid=17762319&method=full&siteid=62484&headline=i-was-7st-stick-insect-model-with-little-work---now-i-m-11st-size-16-and-a-superstar--name_page.html

According to the article,

Crystal is all for the ban. She says: "I'm glad the fashion industry has begun to change and use healthy-sized women. It's not a moment too soon."

Bravo! I hope this reflects her true feelings on the issue.

The rest of the article is about her story, going from starving to curvy. It is a little too detailed about how she remained bone-thin (there is always the danger of mimicked behaviour), but it ends on a very positive note:

Crystal says she will never go back to being skinny - and wants to urge young girls not to do anything as drastic as she did in a bid to make it big in the fashion world..

She says: "I was not happy. Now I am. And if I gain weight, I gain weight. I eat healthily, but I eat what I want. I really like turkey burgers and crab cakes. I love pizza and ice cream!"

She adds: "The biggest lesson I learned is to be who I am. The happiness I feel inside comes through to the camera now, you can see it. It has made me a more successful model."

Now that is the kind of affirmative note that most of Crystals recent publicity has been striking - especially the pure enjoyment of eating. Its very good to hear, and I know it will have a positive impact on young women, and help undo some of the damage that the fashion industry has caused, with its long-standing use of emaciated models. Applause.

M. Lopez
17th September 2006, 20:58
Of all of the excuses used by the fashion agencies to try to defend themselves, the one that outrages me most is their whining about how this ban "discriminates" against thin models. That is the most grotesque hypocrisy!! No industry has ever been as blatantly discriminatory as the fashion industry has been until now (discriminatory against full-figured women, that is). They have had a unspoken ban on plus-size women for decades, and I hope the government ban on emaciated models teach them a lesson about how it feels to have the body type that they worship suppressed - just as they have suppressed plus-size beauty.

This doesn't necessarily mean the end of thin models' careers. All those models will have to do to keep working is eat, to reach a normal, healthy size. For decades, the industry has forced models to starve, and this was excused as being "just part of the job." Well, now they'll have to eat - and this too will be "just part of the job."

The difference, of course, is that this requirement will result in them looking better and being healthier, while the previous requirement ruined their looks and health - and sometimes even caused death.

That's right - death. The article about Crystal Renn referred to the tragedy of "South American model Luisel Ramos, 22, [who] died from heart failure moments after stepping off a catwalk" just last month. It's a shocking case, because it resulted directly from her self-imposed food deprivation:

http://www.modelsblog.info/index.php/2006/08/06/model-dies-on-the-catwalk/

Let the fashion agencies try to excuse their inhuman, androgynous standards to this girl's parents! - or to the parents of all of the girls who have died as a result of the eating disorders that their "standards" have caused.

Shame on any professional who opportunistically tries to defend the industry's hateful and potentially lethal promotion of emaciation.

Micki
18th September 2006, 00:45
Ironically, the minimum weight that government officials are requiring in Madrid (and perhaps other locales now) would still make the models much slimmer than the average woman. Even maintaining the new higher weight would still require virtual starvation and extreme exercise for many women, although it a tiny step forward. I look forward to the day where models with true womanly curves are celebrated, not those who look as if they are in the midst of a famine.

Kaitlynn
18th September 2006, 08:53
Crystal says she will never go back to being skinny...She says: "I was not happy. Now I am. And if I gain weight, I gain weight. I eat healthily, but I eat what I want. I really like turkey burgers and crab cakes. I love pizza and ice cream!"
I applaud Crystal for encouraging young women to free themselves from guilt about eating whatever they like. Along with Barbara Brickner's enthusiastic comments about going to McDonald's after first being approached by a modelling agent, I think statements like this help young women develop a comfortable attitude towards food and appetite. Crystal is confirming that popular saying, "Sexy girls have dessert."

I want to point out an interesting paragraph in the first article in the thread, from the Washington Post. Talking about the Madrid fashion show, it states:

The show, which starts Monday and runs until Friday, wanted to project an image of [B]beauty, elegance and health, and also banned makeup that makes models appear sickly, organizer Cuca Solana said.

I think that's almost as bold and positive a step as banning underweight models. It means that the Spanish organizers are not just combating the anorexic look alone, but the ugliness of the modern aesthetic as a whole, as it has dominated fashion, from freakish makeup, to alien clothing (heroic chic - or worse), which also have a negative influence on youth and society.

This is truly encouraging. I hope it represents the leading edge of a true aesthetic restoration, a rejection of degenerate modernity, and a return to timeless beauty and femininity. I definitely agree with Micki that it is only a tiny step, and that the real dream - of the triumph of plus-size beauty - is still a long ways away. But at least it's a move in the right direction.

Chad
19th September 2006, 03:23
The article about Crystal Renn referred to the tragedy of "South American model Luisel Ramos, 22, [who] died from heart failure moments after stepping off a catwalk" just last month. It's a shocking case, because it resulted directly from her self-imposed food deprivation:

http://www.modelsblog.info/index.php/2006/08/06/model-dies-on-the-catwalk/.
This is shocking in another way, too. What's shocking is that this death didn't even warrant a mention in the mainstream press. I never even heard about it, until now.

Every single day, the media pumps out a slew of fear-mongering stories about suppsed weight "epidemics" and such, about how being full-figured is oh-so-scary, and yet here is a case where a model actually died of an eating disorder - died for real, not in some way-in-the-future scenario - and there's hardly a word about it in the news.

Why? Because no drug companies are going to buy ad space as a result of such stories? Or worse, because the fashion industry doesn't care if a few models die along the way (to say nothing of the women who develop such disorders because of these models' images), as long as they can maintain their toxic and anti-feminine "standards"?

To say that the ban on emaciated models "discriminates" against designers' choices is like saying society "discriminates" against someone who wants to poison the water supply, or market a drug with harmful side effects. It's not "discrimination" to prevent someone from endangering the health of society - especially its most vulnerable membes.

HSG
25th October 2006, 11:44
To say that the ban on emaciated models "discriminates" against designers' choices is like saying society "discriminates" against someone who wants to poison the water supply, or market a drug with harmful side effects. It's not "discrimination" to prevent someone from endangering the health of society - especially its most vulnerable membes.
It is characteristic of our post-Marxist society, a society in which reconstructed socialism (so-called "social justice") is so pervasive, that we only understand "health" in material terms. We create federal organizations (e.g. the FDA) to regulate foodstuffs for carcinogens, for bacteria (e. coli), and for other toxins, and we actively promote physical health (e.g., by fluoridating drinking water). We do not allow rogue producers to impair the material well-being of society.

But what about the <i>cultural</i> well-being of our world? What about the <i>cultural</i> health of society, and its members? That impacts people's lives even more than do their material conditions, or their physical health. Eating disorders, for example, are predominantly caused by psychological conditions, not material ones. If our <i>culture</i> were healthier, fewer individuals would be physically and psychologically unhealthy.

Just as we regulate the material conditions of society to prevent rogue individuals from poisoning people's bodies, so is it right to moderate society's cultural environment to prevent degenerate art from poisoning people's minds. And while it may generally be difficult to determine which specific cultural influences are the most toxic, in <i>this</i> case--in the case of images of androgynous, emaciated models--the pernicious effects are clearly documented, and undeniable.

The fact that healthier alternatives to these culturally ruinous images are readily available makes this a problem that is incredibly easy to remedy. All it would take is to replace images of starving models with images of well-fed, gorgeous, plus-size models, and the fashion industry would instantly be redeemed. It would no longer exert a negative influence on the culture, but a positive one. The solution is right at hand.

Now, all that is required is for the same kind of external controls to moderate the fashion industry that currently moderate television, and at least <i>this</i> cultural influence would become a blessing to society, rather than a curse.

Christina Schmidt, exemplifying the breathtaking beauty that could exist all around us, if our culture were in different hands.<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/christina75a.jpg"></center>

ERagsdale
25th October 2006, 14:39
Ironically, the minimum weight that government officials are requiring in Madrid (and perhaps other locales now) would still make the models much slimmer than the average woman. Even maintaining the new higher weight would still require virtual starvation and extreme exercise for many women, although it a tiny step forward. I look forward to the day where models with true womanly curves are celebrated, not those who look as if they are in the midst of a famine.
Why settle for a meager body when you could just as easily be "healthy plus-size" and look voluptuous and overflowing with good health?

The sad thing is, most of the models who gain weight in order to keep their jobs are still going to be very thin, and will still be presenting the unrealistic images which cause so many women to hate themselves. Still, it is encouraging that steps towards size celebration and a timeless ideal are being taken at all, and one can only hope that it will lead to more positive changes in the future.