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Kaitlynn
21st September 2006, 21:24
The British newspaper The Daily Mail ran an article today about Luisel Ramos, the model who starved to death because of the sick and inhuman aesthetic of the fashion industry:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=406316&in_page_id=1770

It is an utter tragedy, and all the more tragic because of how this story was completely suppressed by the mainstream press until now, at the same time as the the media has continued to pump out thin-supremacist attacks on being full-figured, which is actually an infinitely healthier and more beautiful state for women than being anorexic.

The article also includes a link to a damning expose of the indifference and depravity of the fashion industry, written by Liz Jones.

The entire debate is still being mis-framed, however, because what makes underweight models so toxic is not whether they themselves have eating disorders, but the fact that they induce eating disorders in others - specifically, in the countless young women who are brainwashed by the fashion industry.

- - - -

Another new article praises the British fashion show that Chad posted about, which has banned the inclusion of severely underweight models:

http://iccoventry.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100localnews/tm_objectid=17796524&method=full&siteid=50003&headline=show--right-to-say-no-to-thin-models--name_page.html

Besides pointing out the harmful and potentially fatal results of being thin, it also makes the following important observation about straight-size models:

"On top of that they also look pretty horrible. It really isn't very attractive to look so thin."

HSG
22nd September 2006, 02:56
The entire debate is still being mis-framed, however, because what makes underweight models so toxic is not whether they themselves have eating disorders, but the fact that they induce eating disorders in others - specifically, in the countless young women who are brainwashed by the fashion industry.
This is an absolutely crucial point that is regularly overlooked in this debate.

The other way in which this discussion is frequently misrepresented is by being framed as an opposition between models and non-models, between professionals and amateurs, between ideal beauty and homely "reality."

Nothing could be further from the truth. In adopting fuller-figured models, the fashion industry need not, and should not, give up on beauty, talent, youth, or charisma. It can and will preserve all of these qualities--by using <i>professional plus-size models.</i>

The rejection of emaciated models is not an <i>assault</i> on beauty, but a yearning for <i>greater</i> beauty. It is a campaign to replace modern androgyny with Classical femininity. It is a drive to eschew artificial standards in favour of timeless ideals.

Well-fed models with soft features will showcase the clothing far better than their hard-featured predecessors ever could. They will provide young women with a natural aspirational ideal, one that will make them feel better about themselves, not worse.

When plus-size models represent the industry, fashion will express a aesthetic of pleasure, not pain; of indulgence, not deprivation. And society as a whole--indeed, our ailing culture itself--will grow healthier as a result.

The ethereal yet full-figured beauty of Kelsey Olson (Dorothy Combs/L.A. Models):<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/kelsey/lilac02.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.torrid.com/store/product.asp?LS=0&RN=206&ITEM=519551" target="_blank">Kelsey in a Torrid kimono dress</a>

(Oriental girls have curves, too!)

MelanieW
22nd September 2006, 17:25
That photo of Kelsey is breathtaking. There is another very pretty new image of Kelsey at Torrid:

http://www.torrid.com/store/product.asp?LS=0&RN=204&ITEM=552679

The top is really nice, and I especially like Kelseys hair and makeup. If you use the "zoom" feature, you can see the gold accents that bring out her eyes. And she has such a pretty smile...

M. Lopez
29th September 2006, 12:51
Luisel Ramos, the model who starved to death because of the sick and inhuman aesthetic of the fashion industry
Here's an op-ed piece that makes some very sensible points about the climate in which such a tragedy could occur:

http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=4951

The author makes the crucial point:

There is an expectation that employees are entitled to protection from risks to their health in the course of employment. Yet governments remain blind to an obvious case of employees being subjected to such harms, not by a single employer, but by a pernicious industry culture.

That's exactly the problem - a "pernicious industry culture." The entire industry condones this inhuman aesthetic. How can it be expected to regulate itself, let alone reform?

She lays the scope of the problem out quite clearly:

Fashion designers who insist upon unnaturally thin women as clotheshorses are complicit in the exploitation of young women.

...the veneration of grossly underweight bodies has real social costs. For vulnerable women, such images reinforce and normalise distorted perceptions.

And she makes the important observation that banning anorexic-looking models would actually help the modelling industry, in more ways than one:

There is reason to hope that excluding such a large number of models would pressure the industry to adjust their expectation of model-weight upwards. Short-term unemployment can only be to the long-term advantage of all models.

There is no doubt on which side the public falls, on this issue. But it will all remain just talk, unless some entity, some government, actually steps in and does something, the way Madrid did. Otherwise, the fashion industry will keep poisoning women's minds, and twisting their perceptions, for as long as they can get away with it.