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View Full Version : Charlotte Coyle: ''Size 0 is not attractive''


MelanieW
21st October 2006, 11:15
A thought-provoking article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph today, about the fashion industry and its irresponsible use of underweight models. The article doesnt gloss over the tragic consequences of eating disorders, and it includes statements from many health experts, who identify fashion-industry imagery as causing and/or promoting these diseases:

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/features/story.jsp?story=710878

It also includes a passage about Charlotte Coyle, which is wonderful because it presents her as a viable alternative to the heroinc-chic fashion industry:

Londonderry model Charlotte Coyle (24), who starred in [the] Channel 4 series Shape of the Nation and is now the face of retail giant Simply Be, agreed that there is [an] inextricable link between the fashion and beauty industries and eating disorders.

"I'm not shocked that there's so much anorexia and bulimia around. We are bombarded with skinny models and tiny celebrities and that puts too much social pressure on women and men," she said.

The size 18 beauty hit the big time in the US in 2002 in fashion campaigns for larger ladies, including a 20ft billboard poster in the heart of New York City.

"I have always been a big girl. When I was younger, I desperately wanted to be skinny - particularly when people said 'you would be beautiful if you were thin'. But I learned to be happy with my natural body weight," she said. "Anorexia is a murderous disease and a chronic problem. No woman can wear size zero, never mind 00, and be healthy. It's a shocking look. You have to be in a state of starvation.

"These self styled skinny women all look the same; they all look like wee boys. There should be more positivity about natural body weight. I think there needs to be more models like me.

"The average size of a woman in the UK is 16. Size zero is not attractive..."

Its exciting to learn that Charlotte will be the face of Simply Be. There arent any images of Charlotte there just yet, but Im hoping there will be, in the near future.

The entire article is worth reading. It also includes statements of praise for the Madrid ban on underweight models. Its encouraging to see more people asserting that the fashion industry must become more responsible in the images that it creates, and must be held accountable for the damage that its current "standards" do to young women.

Relena
22nd October 2006, 03:21
Charlotte is such a great role model. If only more media attention were directed towards her, and not starving stick figures.

I completely agree with her. The diet industry and media spread the propaganda that allowing trendy plus-size clothes encourages a so-called "unhealthy" lifestyle, but don't say a word when clothing stores sell size-zero clothing! It doesn't make sense at all. Being curvy IS healthy, while starvation is the truly unhealthy lifestyle.

HSG
24th October 2006, 04:04
The entire article is worth reading. It also includes statements of praise for the Madrid ban on underweight models. Its encouraging to see more people asserting that the fashion industry must become more responsible in the images that it creates, and must be held accountable for the damage that its current "standards" do to young women.
The article is brave and uncompromising in identifying the fashion industry's <i>criminal negligence</i> in causing eating disorders among young women. The writer's juxtaposition of fashion-industry imagery with the case of a young woman who <i>"lies in a hospital bed trying desperately to stay alive after being ravaged by anorexia"</i> is devastating.

One wonders--would fashion designers and magazine editors make different choices if they were forced to confront, first-hand, the victims of the diseases that they promote? Probably not, since they demand precisely the same emaciated look from the models whom they employ.

The simple fact is that these individuals <i>do not care</i> how much misery and suffering their warped vision inflicts. If they did, they would have altered their "standards" years ago, when the first medical research linking fashion-industry imagery and eating disorders emerged.

This makes calls for change within the industry--an example of which this article features--so futile:<p><blockquote><i>Eating Disorders NI spokesperson Ann McCann said that images of super thin models are detrimental. "I'm absolutely appalled. I think those who are leading the way in the fashion industry <strong>need to take some responsibility</strong>."</i></blockquote><p>But they will <i>not</i> take responsibility--this much is clear. That's why <i>external</i> pressure and regulation is absolutely necessary. Only outright enforcement, as per the Madrid example, can institute change. Without this external intervention, the fashion industry will persist in creating degenerate art, and will continue to manipulate the culture to suit its own purposes, poisoning young women's minds in perpetuity.

Charlotte's success is a rare example of a bright light at the end of a long, dark tunnel. As the new "face" of Simply Be, she will effect a staggering transformation in the British plus-size fashion industry, which has, until now, limited itself to the detested and ineffectual faux-plus standard. At last, Charlotte will be given the opportunity to create more images of subversive plus-size beauty, of the kind that she was hitherto only able to create for forward-thinking U.S. clients.

Banner ad from Charlotte's unsurpassable Torrid campaign, Winter 2005:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cc/torrid_ad.gif"></center>