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View Full Version : ''Starving for some common sense''


M. Lopez
6th November 2006, 23:33
Anyone who is sick to death of reading the media's daily barrage of scare stories about nonexistent weight "epidemics" can give these links, and this post, a pass.

But every once in a while, a small glimmer of sanity appears. Here's one:

http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/print.cfm?story=111217&ran=12104

The author points out how ridiculous it is for the media to be trying to dupe the public that it is somehow a "bad" thing that fewer people are starving today than in the past, in the U.S. and around the globe.

Some choice quotes:

By the time I finished reading Sunday's Commentary section, I was starving.

For some common sense.

In a masterful attempt to wring bad news out of good, an article by William Saletan hyperventilated about a worldwide epidemic of pudge while underplaying the happy news that global hunger is in decline.

Maybe I'm missing something, but shouldn't the fact that fewer people on planet Earth are malnourished be greeted with cheers?...

Fact is, more of us have enough to eat.

Any way you look at it, that beats the alternative.

It is so insane that, after centuries during which humanity has tried to overcome malnourishment, so many women today - especially in the West - would actually be willingly subjecting themselves to constant hunger.

If there is an epidemic today, it's an epidemic of self-imposed food deprivation among women (engineered by the diet-starvation industry).

This absurdity has never been better expressed than in a piece I read a few weeks ago, in a satirical web site that is rather like The Onion (creating parodic news stories that make wry points about current affairs).

The title says it all:

"U.N. airlifts food to starving French fashion models" (http://gunsnbutter.typepad.com/gunsnbutter/2006/10/un_airlifts_foo.html)

(Click on the link to read it)

HSG
29th November 2006, 01:52
<br>The authors of the above pieces use satire quite effectively to make their points. However, the fact that many young women in the West are brainwashed into torturing themselves, depriving themselves of the food that they naturally desire, just to take on a skeletal appearance, is no joke.

Any form of dieting is just one step away from a life-threatening eating disorder, as exemplified by the recent deaths from anorexia of not one, but <i>two</i> fashion models (to say nothing of the thousands of young women who develop such disorders through exposure to fashion imagery).

The satirical comment that the U.N should step in to rescue these young women from malnourishment, like famine victims in Africa, is not at all absurd. There <i>is</i> a starvation crisis in the fashion industry--one that results in death, as surely as any famine does. And yet, insane as it may seem, this is entirely a <i>self-imposed</i> tragedy, a case of <i>self-inflicted</i> scarcity and want.

The notion that models can somehow be "healthy" at an emaciated body weight is simply ludicrous. The Bravo program <i>Project Runway,</i> which is in its third season, recently ran an episode featuring outtakes from the series, and one group of outtakes was dubbed "Fainting Models."

This shows just how "healthy" minus-size models really are:

- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/video/fainting.wmv">Click here to view the 60 sec. video</a>

Not only is it traumatic to watch these clearly malnourished girls collapsing on national television, but it is equally shocking to see the flippant and indifferent reactions of the designers, who treat the models' fainting spells as some sort of joke, or a case of "business as usual," or even refuse to believe that the models are genuinely ill.

It reveals the prevailing mindset of fashion-industry insiders, who either cannot understand that their inhuman aesthetic is life-threateningly unhealthy, or who simply <i>do not care</i> if models are passing out--let alone dying--in order to diminish themselves into the requisite skeletal forms.

Despite all mass-media propaganda to the contrary, being <i>full-figured</i> is the natural and healthy feminine condition. Plus-size models give women a comfortable aspirational ideal that allows them to eat whatever they want, and as much as they want, secure in the knowledge that their curvaceous figures are normal--and beautiful.

Ashley Graham modelling for Lane Bryant; for once actually exhibiting the attractive curves of a healthy size-16 figure:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/ag/lb01.jpg"></center>

MelanieW
5th December 2006, 02:50
Not only is it traumatic to watch these clearly malnourished girls collapsing on national television, but it is equally shocking to see the flippant and indifferent reactions of the designers, who treat the models' fainting spells as some sort of joke, or a case of "business as usual," or even refuse to believe that the models are genuinely ill.
The video clip is truly disturbing. Here is a case of not just one, but several models who are unable to stand for any length of time on a catwalk without fainting, and these designers basically imply that its the models own fault! The host even asks "Why do you have that [fainting spell] a lot?"

Why? Well, maybe because these girls arent allowed to eat anything, if they want to fit the emaciated standard that this insane industry maintains. This is the same show where a size SIX model was called "plus" (and not in a good way). THEY, the fashion gurus, are causing this problem, and then they have the audacity to ask why the problem exists.

This is what the Madrid ban was trying to stop - the outright starvation of models.

If a model cant stand on a runway without passing out, it doesnt mean she is "crazy," or a "hypochondriac," as these designers claim. It means she is malnourished! How can these people be so self-absorbed as not to see this?

The amazing thing is, one of the designers in this season was pregnant, and participated right until the final round - and SHE didnt have ANY fainting spells. It shows again just how unhealthy, even life-threatening, it is for models to try to starve down into a skeletal shape. The models are permanently just one step away from total physical collapse.

Maybe these designers, and the producers of this show, could do something really humanitarian and decent and actually select models who have naturally full figures. Maybe then their girls wouldnt be fainting in front of them - let alone dying of anorexia.