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View Full Version : For 2007, curves are in!


MelanieW
1st January 2007, 09:08
Will 2007 bring a restoration of the full-figured ideal? Hope springs eternal, but for now, I remain skeptical, and will believe it when I see it.

Still, the year is off to a good start. A short article I found

http://www.torontodailynews.com/index.php/Style/2006122910style-predictions

announces that for 2007:

"Curves [are] In"
"Curvy will come back. Curvy bodies are officially in!"
It also, amusingly, says:

"Reality TV will get real, prediction says. A new breed of show will emerge, enticing skinny celebrities to gain weight and do something that makes a difference for the world rather than their next photo opportunity"
Such a show would be infinitely more enjoyable and interesting that all the pro-starvation programs that are out there.


More seriously, though, a new op end piece discusses the hoped-for change in the sizes of fashion models:

http://www.columbian.com/opinion/news/12282006news87920.cfm

The tone is cautiously optimistic, yet understandably cynical. Here is the pertinent text.

..................

Even though society continues to glorify the thinner kind and shows women with as little clothing on as possible as often as possible, there is a lot of good news to celebrate.

Last week Italian fashion designers banned size zero models from their catwalks. They are the first in the world to do so. The London Daily Mail reported that the designers signed a joint declaration with the Italian government to ensure that future fashion shows include only models with a body mass index of 18. The Daily Mail story said of the new self-regulation, "Models with a body mass index of less than 18 would not be allowed to take part and all must also present a medical certificate confirming they are in good health."

And get this, larger sizes -- in the fashion world that means women who wear 14s and 16s -- will start appearing in shows. The goal is to show full bodied, healthy women, designers say.

Would it be too much to call this a Christmas miracle?

No 'walking skeletons'

Italy's Fashion Council even admits the modeling industry is part of the problem. In a joint statement with the Italian government, it said, "Many women affected by eating disorders had started dieting to attain the figures of catwalk models and cover girls."

The move comes a month after the death of a Brazilian model and three months after fashion show organizers in Madrid booted five wafer-thin women at Spain's top annual fashion show. The women banned from the show had body mass indexes below 18. For perspective, the five models were all taller than 5 feet 7 inches and weighed less than 122 pounds. "Clearly, we don't want walking skeletons," show organizer Cuca Solana said of banning these unhealthy catwalkers who must hardly have enough energy to even "meow."

Italy's youth minister Giovanna Melandri told reporters of the new code: "It's true that anorexia is not born on the catwalk but the fashion industry could not stand by as an indifferent spectator. The thin models that we have seen on the catwalks have been a cause of the increase in this illness, which has also caused numerous deaths."

In November, fashion designer Giorgio Armani also spoke out against thin models, calling for clarity in the industry and noting, "We all need to work together against anorexia."...

I'm not holding my breath, however. The trend toward healthier models could be fleeting...

The fashion cops are relentless and any amount of f** is apparently still out.

Let's all hope the cheers for healthy, full-figured role models in the fashion industry drown out all of these tired tirades promoting flat stomachs at any expense.

HSG
3rd January 2007, 20:45
And get this, larger sizes -- in the fashion world that means women who wear 14s and 16s -- will start appearing in shows. The goal is to show full bodied, healthy women, designers say. . .

Italy's Fashion Council even admits the modeling industry is part of the problem. . .

Let's all hope the cheers for healthy, full-figured role models in the fashion industry drown out all of these tired tirades promoting flat stomachs at any expense.
Such an admission by the fashion industry is long overdue. Even some plus-size models have (opportunistically) failed to criticize the fashion industry for its pernicious influence on body image, despite the fact that this harmful influence has been conclusively demonstrated by study after study.

All of these curve-friendly statements are genuinely encouraging, but, at the moment, they remain only that--only statements. As the author of the second article right reminds us, the thin-supremacist mindset is so deeply entrenched that it has a life of its own. It perpetuates itself, unchecked, like a viral disease, spreading from one infected host to the next.

It is a cultural dogma, a belief so pervasive, that many women cannot conceive of any other way of viewing the world. The idea that looking "thinner" is somehow "better" is a matter of blind faith (even though it is, in and of itself, an absurd notion), while the truth--that looking curvier is actually aesthetically superior--never enters most women's minds.

A full, curvy waist is far more beautiful than a "flat stomach," yet few women ever realize this. Plus-size beauty has become a "forgotten truth" of human existence, a fact that Western society has been <i>made</i> to forget, by the severing of our civilization's roots, over the past century. This was accomplished via a two-pronged attack: 1. by the erasure of virtually all social awareness of our cultural history, and 2. through a deliberate defamation of that history, among the few who still examine it.

Let us hope that 2007 is the year in which the West recovers from its externally-induced cultural amnesia, and remembers its own aesthetic heritage, which developed in accordance with essential human needs and wishes.

Relaxed and curvaceous Christina Schmidt, modelling an item in Torrid's cleverly-named "Riviera collection" (precisely the sort of "full bodied, healthy woman" that Italy's Fashion Council claims to be seeking):<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/torrid49b.jpg"></center>