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View Full Version : ''Ban all skinny models'' (Australian article)


M. Lopez
11th February 2007, 01:28
The article suffers from some mixed messages, but behind it is the important news of another country which is trying to ban emaciated models.

http://www.news.com.au/sundayheraldsun/story/0,21985,21206455-662,00.html

Again and again, it seems evident that the fashion industry will never reform itself on its own, so sadly, government steps such as the one noted below are absolutely necessary, if the industry's starvation-peddling is ever going to end.

Relevant text here:

Ban all skinny models

Suellen Hinde, Health reporter

February 11, 2007 12:00am


HEALTH Minister Bronwyn Pike has demanded super-thin models be dropped from this year's Melbourne Fashion Festival.

Ms Pike's call came ahead of a renewed Government campaign to warn teenagers of the dangers of fad diets.

"The fashion industry has a clear responsibility not to promote extreme thinness," Ms Pike said yesterday.

She slammed the promotion of an "unhealthy image" for young women as she prepared to launch a third stage of the state's anti-fad diet campaign.

"I think it is really important that models are a reflection of the community," Ms Pike said.

"Those size zero models are not a true reflection of the general public."

The minister began her anti-diet campaign in 2004 with an attack on the popular Atkins Diet.

Last year she criticised the reality TV show The Biggest Loser, claiming it was "unrealistic" because of the radical weight loss by its contestants over a short period.

Ms Pike said small-size models did not send a good message of healthy eating and healthy lifestyle.

"The type of dieting involved to create that body shape is not encouraging a healthy lifestyle," she said...

"To get that size you have to be starving yourself or suffering from an eating disorder.

"Encouraging extreme thinness can have potential long-term damage (because) young girls can become obsessed...

"Fad diets can cause dehydration, weakness and fatigue, nausea, headaches and constipation."

HSG
25th February 2007, 14:34
<br>What elevates this Australian minister's attempt above similarly laudable efforts by statesmen in other countries is that her campaign to ban underweight models is a follow-up to a commendable "anti-diet campaign," as noted in the article above. This is the first time that a public figure has so directly linked these two pernicious influences on society--images of underweight models, and diet propaganda--and she is wise to do so. The connection between the two is clear, as each of these toxic influences reinforces the other.

Images of glamourized emaciation prompt young women to pursue methods of self-starvation, with devastating consequences to their health and well-being. On the flip side, a society that is dominated by diet-industry propaganda (as ours is) no longer recognizes malnutrition when it sees it. Weight-control brainwashing progressively warps people's vision, until they view cadaverous figures as "healthy," and dying models as "glamorous."

Thus, skinny models prompt women to starve, and diet-industry brainwashing makes them think starvation is normal.

A dual campaign to eradicate these two mutually-reinforcing poisons--to ban the use of underweight models, and to eliminate any attempts to persuade young women to diminish their figures--is a wise and necessary effort, for the good of our society, and especially, for the good of the young women who are so vulnerable to these messages.

A converse dual campaign--to extend the use of plus-size models, and to encourage young women to eat whatever they want, and as much as they want--would be just as beneficial, if not moreso. Ideally, the two efforts would go hand in hand, resulting in an elimination of the negative influences on young women, and the introduction of positive influences in their stead.

We wish this health minister well in her efforts, and hope that she succeeds--and that other nations will take up her crusade as well.

The blossoming curves of Christina Schmidt (photo by Fadil Berisha)--the positive ideal of femininity that our culture should be celebrating:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/christina87a.jpg"></center><p>- <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/cs/christina87.jpg" target="_blank">Click to view larger</a>