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renata
5th March 2007, 20:59
I found a couple of articles that I thought everybody here would appreciate. They show the opposite of what most news stories claim about the relationship between health, diet, and being full-figured.

The first warns about the dangers of being thin, and how this could lead to osteoperosis:

http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2007-02-01T145642Z_01_L01900473_RTRUKOC_0_US-OSTEOPOROSIS-ANOREXIA.xml&WTmodLoc=HealthNewsHome_C2_healthNews-3

Here are a few points:

Skinny teenagers and girls suffering from anorexia could be seriously damaging their bones and increasing their risk of osteoporosis later in life.

The debate about underweight models has captured headlines but the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) said little attention is given to the link between anorexia and osteoporosis or the long-term consequences of dieting during adolescence -- the greatest period of bone growth.

"Anorexia is serious but not everybody realizes that it has a serious implication for bone health," said Paul Spencer Sochaczewski, of the Swiss-based IOF...

"The age at which most women develop anorexia is during the teenage age years which is also when bones develop the fastest and they develop their peak bone mass. If they miss out on that they are going to be damaging their bone health in later life," Sochaczewski told Reuters....

Smoking and drinking heavily, low body weight and a family history of the illness are also risk factors for osteoporosis.
What's especially important is that the research shows that a girl doesn't even have to go so far as having an eating disorder to ruin her health. Just by dieting, and having a "low body weight," she is dramatically increasing her risk of suffering osteoperosis.

Once again, the truth is that being full-figured, having a higher body weight, and NOT dieting, is actually heathier than being thin.

The other article shows that dietary, low-calorie foods can lead to infertility, and that more calorie-rich foods, like desserts, actually improve fertility:

http://www.canada.com/topics/bodyandhealth/story.html?id=c433bb96-70d5-4947-a64b-b25d6177f908

Excerpts:

Women hoping to get pregnant might consider swapping low-fat yogurt for vanilla fudge ripple ice cream, a new study suggests.

...those who consumed more low-fat dairy foods, especially yogurt, sherbet and frozen yogurt, were 85 per cent more likely than women who ate high-fat dairy foods - notably ice cream and whole milk - to experience anovulatory infertility, a common cause of female infertility where women don't ovulate properly.

...women trying to conceive should consider changing their diets, for example "swapping skimmed milk for whole milk and eating ice cream"
So it turns out that indulging in dessert doesn't just make voluptuous vixens sexier - but healthier, too!

klara
6th March 2007, 08:06
I have a friend who works as a physical therapist. She has constantly told that being "overweight" (which is actually the perfect weight) helps against osteoporosis. Being normal weight even doesn't put enough pressure on the skeleton. We "overweight" girls can rejoice in our legs longer in life then our skinnier sisters.

HSG
15th May 2007, 12:28
<br>These findings are wonderful to hear, but will come as no surprise to long-time readers of this forum. One of the earliest threads on this board, when it debuted, concerned the news that indulgence in <a href="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/board/showthread.php?t=59" target="_blank">chocolate</a> is actually <i>healthy</i> for the female body. Many subsequent studies have confirmed those initial findings, rendering chocolate's salubrious properties an established (if suppressed and underreported) medical fact.

Of course, all that is required to come to this realization is a little common sense. Compare the sight of a well-fed beauty, her fair complexion flushed, her limbs soft and round, with a sunken-cheeked, skeletal, famished model, and it will be self-evident that the fuller-figured goddess is far healthier than her stick-limbed rival.

Only a non-stop barrage of weight-loss brainwashing has managed to distort society’s vision to the point that many individuals now view malnourishment as "healthy," and plumpness as "not healthy"--which is as absurd and counter-intuitive as thinking that dehydrated, shrivelled, brown grass is healthier than a lush green lawn.

Even writers who, in other centuries, faulted plus-size beauty for moral reasons, still acknowledged its sensuality and vigor. In her novel <i>Villette,</i> Charlotte Bronte has the emaciated narrator of the story, Lucy Snowe, (an instructor in English at a Belgian school), describe the gorgeous, self-indulgent young beauties who are her students:<p><blockquote><i>Young heads simply braided, and fair forms (I was going to write </i>sylph<i> forms, but that would have been quite untrue: several of these "jeunes filles," who had not numbered more than sixteen or seventeen years, <strong>boasted contours as robust and solid</strong> as those of a stout Englishwoman of five-and-twenty)--fair forms robed in white, or pale rose, or placid blue, <strong>suggested thoughts of heaven and angels</strong>. I knew a couple, at least, of these "rose et blanche" specimens of humanity. . . during three months I had one of them for my vis-à-vis at table, and <strong>the quantity of household bread, butter, and stewed fruit, she would habitually consume at "second déjeuner" was a real world's wonder</strong>--to be exceeded only by the fact of her actually pocketing slices she could not eat.</i> (Ch. XX, "The Concert")</blockquote><p>Even Bronte’s uptight narrator has to acknowledge that these youthful plus-size girls with their insatiable appetites are extraordinarily attractive (suggesting "thoughts of heaven and angels"), and healthy ("robust").

Only in our own misuigded era have we seen this natural truth upended. However, as time goes on, more and more studies will steadily emerge showing that being fuller-figured is a far healthier state for women than being emaciated, and that the very delicacies which the weight-control cabal has branded as sinful are actually <i>needed</i> by the body, and measurably improve its health and vitality.

Stock photo of vivacious plus-size model (unidentified) pushing aside rabbit food in favour of beauty-enhancing chocolate:<p><center><img src="http://www.judgmentofparis.com/forum/stock/stock01.jpg"></center><p>As the saying goes, (and as this image proves,) <i>"Sexy girls have dessert."</i>

Kaitlynn
22nd June 2007, 18:47
Here are a couple of findings that deserve to be mentioned in this thread. More and more research is showing that being full-figured is far healthier than being thin.

One study shows that plumpness actually reduces the risk of breast cancer:

http://www.thesun.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,2-2006550262,00.html

There are a number of articles about this online, but here's the pertinent info:

WOMEN with puppy f** at the age of 18 have a lower breast cancer risk, research has revealed.

And girls around one to three stone [14-32 pounds] over their "ideal" weight reap the most benefits.In other words, that so-called "ideal" weight isn't ideal at all, because it's far too low, and a higher weight is actually the true ideal- both for health, and for beauty.


Another study shows that being full-figured actually reduces the risk of heart failure:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/World/Obesity-may-reduce-risk-of-heart-failure/2007/01/20/1169096023659.html

The article has some negative terminology, but the important facts are these:

[Full-figured] patients hospitalised with heart failure tend to fare better than their lean counterparts, new research suggests.

"This study suggests that [full-figured] patients may have a greater metabolic reserve to call upon during an acute heart failure episode which may lessen in-hospital (death) risk," said lead investigator Dr Gregg Fonarow...

The team found that in-hospital deaths fell as BMI rose, even after accounting for factors including age, gender, blood pressure, and heart rate.

For example, the overall in-hospital death rate was five per cent in those with the lowest BMI versus 2.2 per cent in those with the highest.

For every five unit increase in BMI, the death risk fell by 10 per cent...

"These findings raise the possibility that nutritional/metabolic support may have therapeutic benefit in specific patients hospitalised with heart failure," Fonarow said.Translating those euphemisms, "metabolic reserve" and "nutritional/metabolic support" simpy means that a well-fed female body is a healthier body, and is far better equipped to handle any physical shocks.

It makes perfect sense. Nature made plumpness in women beautiful because it is a visible indicator of health, and not all of the diet propaganda in the world can change that.

holly
23rd June 2007, 05:40
I knew eating chocolate was good for us. It's nice to reconfirm it .