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Old 6th June 2009   #5
HSG
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Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 1,784
Default Living in a better time


The following news item provides a welcome alternative to the dismal circumstances noted earlier in this thread.

Forum reader and contributor Maureen recently sent us a link to a British article about women who have rejected the modern world and embraced a more traditional existence.

The article profiles wives who have adopted a style of living from the 1950s, the '40s, and the '30s. Not surprisingly, the most interesting of the three is a woman named Joanne Massey, who favours the 1950s, since that was undoubtedly the least disagreeable decade of the 20th century (post World War I). Her fashions are also by far the most attractive.

The following excerpt from the article quotes Massey's account of her life--but interested readers will want to view the actual Web page (linked below), to see the accompanying illustrations.

Massey writes:

I love nothing better than fastening my [apron] round my waist and baking a cake for Kevin in my 1950s kitchen.

I put on some lovely Frank Sinatra music and am completely lost in my own little fantasy world. In our marriage, I am very much a lady and Kevin is the breadwinner and my protector.

We've been married for 13 years and we're extremely happy because we both know our roles. There is none of the battling for equality that I see in so many marriages today.

What's wrong with wanting to be adored and spoiled? If I see a hat I like, I say 'Oh, we can't afford that' and Kevin says: 'You have it, I'll treat you.'

I don't even put petrol in our Ford Anglia car, which is 43 years old, because I think that is so unladylike. I ask Kevin to do it.

I make sure our home is immaculate, there is dinner on the table, and I look pretty to welcome my husband home.

I only ever wear 1950s clothing, such as tight skirts [and] a white blouse.

Kevin wears 'modern' clothes for work, but at weekends he wears a smart suit and a trilby.

I admit I am in retreat from the 21st century. When I look at the reality of the world today, with all the violence, greed and materialism, I shudder. I don't want to live in that world.

I try not to interact with the modern world too much at all.

My obsession began as a teenager, when I loved old movies because they seemed to represent a halcyon time, when women were more feminine and men more protective.

Today's society is all rush, rush, rush, whereas I like to take my time.

It may sound silly, but living like this really does make me happier - as though I'm existing in one of those old-fashioned TV shows where everything is always wonderful.

Some women I meet ask me if I feel patronised by being a housewife and spending my time caring for Kevin, but I never would.

At work, he gets teased because he's the only one with home-made cakes and even home-made jam in his sandwiches.

But I often wonder if his colleagues aren't slightly jealous that he has a wife who devotes herself to his happiness. How many men these days can really say that?


Although adopting a full-fledged time-travel existence such as this may not be possible for everyone, many elements of Massey's scenario could easily be incorporated into contemporary life.

And besides, the 1950s trappings are only incidental. What is far more important is the mindset that they represent. How inspiring it is to see men and women conceptually rejecting the modern world and its degenerate values, and relating to each other in a more traditional, natural way.

Consider how Massey's happiness in her domestic situation contrasts with the misery that women experience when they uncritically, mindlessly buy into feminist brainwashing (as described by the articles linked earlier in this thread). Massey and her husband obviously love and cherish each other deeply. Many could learn from their example.

Kim Novak--luscious starlet of the '50s and early '60s, and perhaps the closest that Hollywood ever came to embracing timeless beauty.

- Click here to read article

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