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Old 28th July 2011   #5
Tanya
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 2011
Posts: 105
Default Re: Being full-figured is good for health (study)

Here's another definitive debunking of a weight myth, this one regarding what is a "good" food and what is not.

According to a recent clinical study, and contrary to popular belief, generously indulging in candy does not impact health in any way. Neither does it increase risk factors of any kind, nor -- and this is the really interesting part -- nor does it lead to weight increase.

I found two abstracts about the study which make the conclusions very clear. This is from the original source.

http://www.nrjournal.com/article/S0...0015-7/abstract

The title says it all:

Quote:
Candy consumption was not associated with body weight measures, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or metabolic syndrome

It acknowledges that up till now, there have been no actual studies in this area. So everyone who has been attempting to demonize fun foods has been going on nothing.

Quote:
There is limited research examining the relationship of candy consumption by adults on diet and health.

The conclusion is pretty self-explanatory:

Quote:
Results suggest that the current level of candy consumption was not associated with health risks.

Okay, that covers adults. But what about children? Well, another study dealt with children and adolescents. Guess what it determined?

http://www.foodandnutritionresearch...ticle/view/5794

That's right:

Quote:
This study suggests that candy consumption did not adversely affect health risk markers in children and adolescents.

Now, here's the really myth-busting aspect:

Quote:
Candy consumers were 22 and 26%, respectively, less likely to be "over"weight and ob*** than non-candy consumers. Blood pressure, blood lipid levels, and cardiovascular risk factors were not different between total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumers and non-consumers

Less likely? It almost takes the fun out of candy knowing that it doesn't lead to weight gain! But it doesn't -- and more importantly, it does not negative impact health.

The study involving children is especially useful, because curvy girls are routinely demonized for not starving themselves and for eating anything other than prison rations. Well, it turns out that all of that externally imposed (or even self-imposed) guilt was for nothing.

The moral of the story: eat what you like, and as much as you like. The weight bigots' attempts to demonize food are just a tissue of lies.
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