View Single Post
Old 10th April 2012   #9
Graham
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 238
Default Re: Interview with Sophie Sheppard

In their interviews, I've noticed that plus-size models always present themselves as very modest about their looks, so it's a pleasure to see how, with a little coaxing, a model can be prompted to express some justified pride in her beauty. I loved this part of the interview, and the audio recording really brought it to life. At first, Sophie sounds hesitant, but then she speaks with real pleasure about her beauty:

Quote:
To further explore Sophie’s awareness of her own allure, I began my next question with a gentle imperative: “You have to answer this. What would you say is the most attractive aspect of your appearance?”

“Of my appearance? Oh, God, I don’t know,” she replied.

I knew it would take a moment for her to acknowledge her own beauty. “What?” I gently prodded her.

“I don’t know. I like… I like my hair. I’ve always had thick hair. Yeah, I have always had a lot, a lot of thick, blonde hair, so that’s been such a huge asset.” As she continued speaking, she quickly warmed to the topic. “I’ve never needed extensions, or I’ve never needed anything like that, so I’m all real. Everything’s real. So, yeah, I love my hair. I like my lips..."

(And in the audio, she goes on to say something quite candid.)

In this context, Sophie's referring herself to "real" is more than a reference to the common presentation of full-figured girls as "real women." Indeed, Sophie's comment is factually justified, because after all, the minus-size models often inject and implant themselves with silicone or other artificial matter, to compensate for the flat-as-a-board frames that their starvation-torture routines have given them. They not only look plastic, they are plastic, or at least part of their bodies are. So they contrast between the reality of Sophie's soft flesh and fair hair and her rivals' synthetic physical structures is definite: it literally is the difference between a real body and an artificial body.
Graham is offline   Reply With Quote