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Old 24th February 2006   #2
HSG
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Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 1,784
Default ''A new era in fashion''


What is particularly encouraging about Emily's article is that the author identifies the new appreciation of "lace . . .chiffon, taffeta, bows, satin, and large costume jewelry" as a definable "new era in fashion." And that, it certainly is. It enables a goddess to introduce a touch of romance and fantasy into the prosaic modern world. It allows her to say, yes, she may live in 2006--but in another time, she could have been a princess, whom gallant suitors would have courted; or a muse, who might have inspired the creation of the greatest works of art.

Such styles offer more opportunities for creative expression than do boring basics, or androgynous suits. And no matter how popular this trend becomes, each individual piece will still be far more unique, and will better exemplify the personality of the particular wearer, than if, say, the trend were for uniform shirts, or for trenchcoats.

And as with every development in fashion's "New Femininity," these lace styles are tailor-made to accentuate the beauty of a curvaceous figure, and far better adorn a voluptuous shape than they do an underweight frame. And no wonder--since they represent a revival of styles that were developed when the generously-proportioned female figure was the unquestioned ideal of beauty.

Thus far, images of lace dresses featured on plus-size models have been hard to come by, but hopefully, this will change in the near future. In the meantime, here is a lovely image of Maiysha in a lace top, from a current Lane Bryant ad. And the gallery linked below includes some images of Barbarba Brickner showing off lace tops, from the Spring 2006 Nordstrom collection.

Hopefully, this trend represents something far more significant than even a "new era in fashion." It may herald a new era--period. A richer era. A more creative era. A more inspired era. A more Romantic era.

And after a century of modernist minimalism, and the "aesthetics of guilt," its arrival is extremely welcome . . .

- New Barbara Brickner gallery

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