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Old 11th December 2005   #1
Emily
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Join Date: July 2005
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Default ''Slim = sad. Plus = happy'' (article)

A new article just published today in the British newspaper The Independent announced the results of a thorough study that was recently completed in Europe about the relationship between starvation and misery, vs. curves and happiness. And the conclusions prove what many of us have long believed:

Weight loss causes misery, and being fuller-figured actually does bring happiness.

I was stunned to see the results corroborate this theory. I would never have expected such an admission from the mainstream media. But here's the link to this revolutionary article:

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/he...ticle332389.ece

and in case it "disappears," here is the astonishing text:

.................................

Quote:
Slim = sad. [Curvy] = happy

If you think going on a diet is depressing, you are right. And here's the part that really hurts



By Roger Dobson and Tom Anderson

Published: 11 December 2005


It is the body type that millions yearn for. They seek slender, toned perfection, thinking it will bring sex, power and happiness. However, they should prepare to be disappointed - and deeply depressed.

A new study has revealed that, rather than being content and confident, slim people struggle to deal with life's woes. Anxiety and mental suffering often dominate their lives - to such a degree that they are much more likely to commit suicide than large people.

The startling new insight into the deep mental troughs many slender people sink into comes in a report led by psychologists at Bristol University. They teamed up with colleagues across Europe to study the lifestyles of thousands of people and the results were stark: thin people were far less happy than rotund ones.

Over a 16-year period, the ups and downs of more than a million lives were examined and it was found that as a person's body mass index (BMI) rose the risk of serious depression fell. And when the scientists considered more than 3,000 people who had committed suicide they found that their BMI was on average significantly lower than those who did not kill themselves.

Various other factors that could bias the results, such as socio-economic status, were taken into account.

"We were quite surprised as there is a view that people who are overweight may be stigmatised and made to feel depressed," said Professor David Gunnell, of Bristol University, one of the authors of the study, which is to appear in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

"Our findings provide some support for the idea that [larger] people are at a reduced risk of the problems that lead to suicide."

That did not come as a surprise to those who warn about the dangers of losing weight.

Joanne Roper, of Hugs International, an anti-diet pressure group, said: "Slimming makes you miserable. Dieting can bring people down and make them obsessed with their body image. You've got to be happy with what you've got and not worry about things too much. It takes work but if you can accept yourself as you then you'll be happy generally."

Concetta Clarizo, 31, from Essex, said that when she lost weight it had not made her happy. "Dieting books always have very clear rules, which are eat less and exercise more and then you'll be normal and then you'll be happy. Well it's rubbish."

The daytime television presenter Fern Britton drew criticism when she insisted that she was "a jolly size 16" and said that diets did not make people happy.

Emma Hayes, 44, from Brighton, agreed. "Being thin is not a recipe for happiness," she said. "I've never dieted in my life and I'm wonderfully happy. I don't know many people that are happier than me."

The pan-European study revealed that for each 5kg per square metre increase in BMI, the risk of suicide decreased by 15 per cent.

Exactly why is not clear, although there are a number of theories. Some research shows that people with insulin resistance, a condition associated with a raised BMI, may have a reduced risk of depression and suicidal behaviour.

Insulin resistance is associated with levels of serotonin, the feel-good hormone. One of the main types of antidepressant drugs works by increasing the amount of serotonin.

It is possible, researchers say, that people who eat more have higher levels of serotonin, which may lower levels of depression. Other research has found a link between ob***ty and low levels of anxiety and depression . . . .

SIZE MATTERS

Not thin Emma Hayes is 44, single and lives in Brighton. She is the owner of Emma Plus, a fashion store for larger women.

"Being thin is not necessarily a recipe for happiness. I've never dieted, and I'm wonderfully happy. I don't know many people happier than me. I think the thing is to be contented and accepting of who you are.

"Many of the things I have are due to me being large. I have my own business and I really enjoy it and I have beautiful clothes and I have my health.

"We laugh at work. One of my customers drove past the other day and saw us all dancing around the shop. Life is what you make of it.

Thin Concetta Clarizio is 31 and lives in Essex with her boyfriend. She shed pounds dieting but laments that it has not lifted her spirits.

"Being thin is not all it's cracked up to be. Getting there and staying that way can be a real mental drain for some. Dieting is about deprivation. It can make you more depressed than being ob***.

"I tried diets with the food replacement drinks. I felt I was being punished and the portions were being reduced for no justifiable reason."

Last edited by HSG : 9th January 2010 at 01:54. Reason: Text set off in quote box
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Old 11th December 2005   #2
kirsten
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Default Re: ''Slim = sad. Plus = happy'' (article)

It's terrific to read that science is backing up what many of us have felt and intuited on a personal level for years.

Deprivation and prolonged hunger create sadness; fulfillment and sensual delight create joy.

Which is the better choice? The answer is obvious.
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Old 13th December 2005   #3
HSG
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Default Re: ''Slim = sad. Plus = happy'' (article)


How fascinating. If this study had reached the opposite conclusion, it would have been trumpeted on every nighttime newscast, and covered on the front page of every newspaper. Instead, these absolutely revolutionary findings are being studiously ignored; although, with a million test subjects, it is clearly "legitimate" in a way that most diet-industry-funded studies are not.

And yet the results--as Kirsten notes--merely confirm what most people intuitively realize (until and unless they are brainwashed by the mass media).

Consider this: The basic principle of life on earth is that all organisms possess instincts that promote the success of their species. Therefore, women today would not possess such generous appetites, if indulging them did not make them healthier, happier, and more attractive to the opposite sex.

The body feels pain when it is being harmed, and pleasure when it is being improved. The suffering that a woman feels when she diets or exercises is an unmistakable indication that these are not beneficial activities, whereas the joy that attends her indulgence in food cravings is nature's "green light" for this activity.

And part of the reason why women who lose weight experience depression (as this study demonstrates) is likely because they instincitvely realize that they are actually diminishing their beauty and femininity.

Note the following excerpt from the article:

"We were quite surprised as there is a view that people who are overweight may be stigmatised and made to feel depressed," said Professor David Gunnell, of Bristol University, one of the authors of the study.

And why does such an absurd view exist in the first place? For one simple reason: because the thin-supremacist media promotes it.

Even seemingly benign programs may actually be detrimental, then, in propagating this myth of the wretchedness of being curvaceous.

And many of the individuals who purport to be "helping" the so-called "size-acceptance" movement actually do more harm than good, when they perpetuate this misguided stereotype.

Every manipulative program in which an underweight actress, or model, or reporter, dons synthetic padding in order to appear fuller figured, and to "experience what it must be like," conveys a barely-concealed contempt for the subjects of the study. The sickening undercurrent in these programs is, "Oh, you're full-figured, you must be so miserable--but I feel your pain."

This is not empathy. This is self-serving pity posturing; and, as the Stoics taught us two millennia ago, pity and disdain are two sides of the same coin.

(Pity, like resentment, is the mortal enemy of size celebration.)

And perhaps the most pernicious result of perpetuating this colossal myth is the fact that some plus-size women actually end up believing it, and begin seeing themselves as victims, rather than vixens.

* * *

So why has this myth of the pitiable full-figured woman persisted, even though this study proves it to be false?

Psych 101 offers us a good explanation.

We trust that everyone here remembers the meaning of that basic psychological concept known as PROJECTION. If not, here is the serviceable OED definition:

Projection: 9.b. Psychoanal. The unconscious process or fact of projecting one's fears, feelings, desires, or fantasies on to other persons, things, or situations, in order to avoid recognizing them as one's own and so as to justify one's behaviour.

Ergo, since self-imposed starvation and torture regimens lead to depression and misery (as this study reveals), and since today's media is largely in the hands of women who subject themselves to such practices, then they are clearly projecting their own unhappiness and frustration onto full-figured women, whenever they depict them in the media.

This explains why the only full-figured actresses who ever are permitted to appear on screen are those who lack any semblance of beauty. The very notion of a gorgeous, plus-size goddess is incomprehensible to the starving media moguls.

Or rather, perhaps such "voluptuous vixens" are all too comprehensible (and familiar) to them. Perhaps they remind the latter-day Mary Wollstonecrafts and George Eliots who run today's media of all of the attractive, flirtatious, coquettish, well-endowed rivals who, in high school and in college, enjoyed the lion's share of attention and popularity (and boyfriends) that they themselves secretly coveted.

And the fact that these self-indulgent goddesses could eat whatever they wished, while their wispy rivals starved themselves, and could enjoy life to the fullest, while the waifs subjected themselves to exercise regimens, seemed to them the very height of injustice.

Therefore, they now spend their media careers exacting a kind of wish-fulfillment revenge upon them, by transforming these princesses into scullery-maids, by turning Shannon Maries and Lillian Russells into Camryn Manheims and Rosie O'Donnells, by projecting their own resentment and unhappiness onto them. Or by effacing their existence altogether.

Many envy-based ideologies and "isms" are based on a similar set of underlying psychological principles (i.e., the envy of the blessed by the ill-favoured). But the basic pettiness (and cruelty) of this impulse is never more clearly exposed than in this particular subject.

That is why it behooves every admirer of full-figured femininity to rush to its defence, and to break a lance--or move a pen--on its behalf, whenever opportunity permits.

Goody's junior-plus model (also seen at Dillard's); happier, healthier, and lovelier than any malnourished waif:

(Possibly Caitlin Ketron, Campbell agency, size 14.)


Last edited by HSG : 13th December 2005 at 04:24.
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Old 29th December 2005   #4
M. Lopez
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Default Re: ''Slim = sad. Plus = happy'' (article)

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSG
Every manipulative program in which an underweight actress, or model, or reporter, dons synthetic padding in order to appear fuller figured, and to "experience what it must be like," conveys a barely-concealed contempt for the subjects of the study. The sickening undercurrent in these programs is, "Oh, you're full-figured, you must be so miserable--but I feel your pain."

And perhaps the most pernicious result of perpetuating this colossal myth is the fact that some plus-size women actually end up believing it, and begin seeing themselves as victims, rather than vixens.

Just today, I saw another program of this type on TV, only this time, I "watched" it in a whole new way. These shows ARE demeaning, and they are obviously inteded to diminish the budding confidence of full-figured women.

It's amazing that the truth is exactly the opposite of the myth, and that underweight women are actually more miserable (as the study that was mentioned in this thread shows). And sure enough, it's a a truth that the media will do everything in its power to suppress.
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Old 13th December 2005   #5
MelanieW
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Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 441
Default Re: ''Slim = sad. Plus = happy'' (article)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily
"I felt I was being punished and the portions were being reduced for no justifiable reason."

Wow, that was such an eye-opening article, Emily. Thanx for finding it. I think the quotations in the article are exactly right right - food deprivation is just senseless self-punishment. No wonder it makes people miserable.

And I think there is a lot of truth in the idea that women who lose weight secretly realize that they are losing their looks too. I just came across an article today about Kate Beckinsale, and how she felt she looked better when she gained weight for an upcoming movie role. Her husband apparently thought so too. I thinkeverybody now realizes this - except nearly everyone who works in the media that is.

Heres the link:

http://www.contactmusic.com/new/xml...t%20love%20life

and the text:

...............................................


BECKINSALE'S CURVES BOOST LOVE LIFE

British screen beauty KATE BECKINSALE is revelling in her new-found curves after putting on weight for her latest film CLICK, because the extra weight boosted her sex life.

The AVIATOR star, 32, put on 20 pounds (9.07 kilograms) to play DONNA NEWMAN in Click, much to her husband of 18 months LEN WISEMAN's delight.

Beckinsale says, "I had much bigger boobs and bottom and Len enjoyed my voluptuous body.

"It was nice he didn't run away screaming and I know he'll be around when I do decide to let myself go."
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