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Old 20th September 2006   #1
M. Lopez
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Default Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Charlotte Coyle is the subject of a major article in today's issue of The Telegraph - a top British newspaper. Not only is it an absolutely wonderful and truly positive article, but of all of the publicity that's surrounded Spain's ban on underweight models, this is probably the most thoughtful and intelligent discussion.

There are some especially great quotes, but the whole article is well worth reading. The link is here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/.../efskinny20.xml

and the complete text is below:

...................

'It shouldn't be skinny or nothing'

(Filed: 20/09/2006)

'Plus-size' model Charlotte Coyle tells Victoria Lambert why she's taking on the waif-like catwalk models



Charlotte Coyle would have no problems in Madrid. At 5ft 11in, with long blonde hair, huge aquamarine eyes and undeniable charisma, she is a successful model. She also has one vital statistic that the organisers of the Spanish capital's Fashion Week might find particularly attractive a body mass index (BMI) of 26.4.

BMI (calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in metres ) is the indicator used to determine a healthy weight, and the Spaniards have caused a furore by declaring that all models on the catwalk this week must have a BMI of more than 18. This is an attempt to stop scarily underweight models stalking the runways like death on two legs.

In fact Charlotte's figure is actually rather too impressive even for el fashionistas. Her BMI is just over the top edge of the "normal" range. And that is the reason why, despite her stunning looks, Charlotte has not been asked to hop on to the catwalk this week in Madrid, London or anywhere else.

Yet this is something she's proud of. For her success as a model so far has been in the "plus-size" market, and now Charlotte is the face for a very different, albeit unofficial, fashion campaign one that aims to change radically the way the modelling industry works.

In March she was the subject of a Channel 4 documentary, Beauty Reborn, that followed her attempts to get a plus-size beauty pageant off the ground. Not surprisingly, she found most of the fashion industry unable or unwilling to get involved. It is not a position Charlotte has much time for.

"The fashion industry is supposed to be about shock," she says. "So let's do something really shocking like using bigger models."

Certainly, the time is ripe for a new attack on the cult of extreme thinness. Madrid's decision to ban ultra-thin models follows the death of Luisel Ramos, 22, in Uruguay last month from a heart attack moments after stepping off a catwalk. She had been told to lose weight and had been existing on little more than fluids.

Elsewhere in the world, however, the Spanish edict has been met with equal amounts of cheer and scorn. The Mayor of Milan threatened to follow suit, while an Australian modelling boss declared it a "positive step" for the industry. But in New York the talk was of discrimination lawsuits and in Paris, well, "everyone would laugh", says Didier Grumbach, the head of the French Couture Federation.

London's fashion community declared itself unmoved even when Tessa Jowell, the Culture Secretary, called for designers to shun girls who appear too skinny. The Government is being lobbied by doctors and parents, who are alarmed by the trend among celebrities to shrink themselves to an American size 0 (British size 4). This, they argue, is having a quantifiable effect on the number of girls suffering from anorexia.

Dr Jon Goldin of Great Ormond Street Hospital in London said yesterday that the glamourisation of emaciated women was significantly to blame for the number of seven-year-olds being treated for eating disorders.

One of Britain's most successful models, 18-year-old Lily Cole, whose size has been particularly criticised, has decided to fight back. "I am fine," she says. "I am healthy. I eat." At 5ft 11in the same height as Charlotte Coyle she would need to weigh at least 9 stone 3lb to be allowed onto the Madrid catwalk. While her weight is a closely guarded secret, most observers doubt she is that heavy.

Charlotte is more relaxed about revealing her weight. "I think I am about 13 stone." she says. Raised in a family of five children in Derry, Northern Ireland, Charlotte, 24, was raised on regular Irish food and was a "chubby child", she says.

By her teens she was a size 14-16 and dieting furiously. "I read all the magazines and I believed their message: that you can't be beautiful unless you look like this that is, thin. So I tried eating nothing but steamed rice and drinking water, crazy stupid diets like that. I thought being thin would make me happy."

Charlotte's breakthrough came in America four years ago. She was working as a receptionist in a salon in Washington when someone came in and uttered those immortal words: "You should be a model."

What he meant was plus-size modelling, a huge industry in America, where so many women are ob*** but still dare to enjoy clothes.

Charlotte was overjoyed when an agency took her on its books. "I never liked being bigger suddenly I was valued for it. In front of the camera for my first shoot, I finally found what I was good at."

Charlotte returned to the UK a size 18-20, with a portfolio she was sure would land her work. It was, however, very different. "The negativity was horrible. I was healthy looking but agencies told me to drop to a size 14. Don't you think that is outrageous? In the real world, size 14 is not a 'plus' size. The average British woman is size 16 and about 5ft 5in tall."

Charlotte is not a model basher. "Some of the girls on the catwalk are naturally slim and they look good. There are girls who are naturally size 8 and that is okay. But others are forcing themselves. You can tell who has an eating disorder their bones are sticking out everywhere, their faces are emaciated and their eyes are saying 'feed me'. It is so sad someone had to die for this issue to be properly debated."

During filming of her documentary, Charlotte interviewed many of fashion's most influential names. The experience left her in no doubt about where the taste for skinny models originated, and why.

"The magazine editors told me they couldn't use larger models even sporadically as the designers didn't make any clothes big enough. Designers told me it cost too much money to create larger ranges."

Her solution is simple. Why not keep the slimmer girls for the catwalk, but use bigger girls for advertising and editorial work, for cosmetics, for example?

"There's no issue about clothes sizes, and bigger girls have less wrinkled skin, anyway. Let's have variety," she says.

Charlotte is now with the Close Models agency run by Harriet Close, who agrees with her. "The larger girls have fabulous skin and look incredibly healthy. I think women want to see models who look more like them who have a few curves."

[Spelling corrected--HSG]

Last edited by HSG : 20th September 2006 at 03:42.
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Old 20th September 2006   #2
HSG
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Default Charlotte on the COVER of the Daily Telegraph!


Not only is this a marvellous article, but Miss Coyle even appears on the cover of the online edition of today's Daily Telegraph. Below is a capture (reduced to screen size) of the Telegraph home page at the time of this writing, with an arrow indicating Charlotte's cover image. Her picture is, in fact, larger than any other editorial graphic on the cover page (the "hand" image is merely an advertisement):

Click to enlarge

The Telegraph knows full well that a picture of Charlotte Coyle will sell a million copies.

If we look more closely at this graphic linking to Charlotte's article, we see that the tone of the cover line promoting the story is excitingly bellicose, announcing a "War of the sizes," and stating that Charlotte is "taking on the waif-obsessed fashion industry":

(Note that Charlotte's article receives top billing, even above the link to pictures of London Fashion Week.)

Then, if we proceed to the landing page of today's Telegraph's fashion section (which is an acclaimed source of fashion information, renowned particularly for the insight of its highly-revered fashion director, Hilary Alexander), we sees another image of Charlotte completely stealing the show from the reports about London Fashion Week:

Click to enlarge

Once again, the cut line is fittingly combative, stating that Charlotte represents the "New Look" of fashion, and that she is "taking on the waif-like catwalk models":

And who could possibly be a better warrior on behalf of timeless beauty than Miss Coyle--this modern-day Valkyrie, this living embodiment of the Classical ideal?

One look at Charlotte's images will prompt precisely two reactions from Telegraph readers:

1. It's about time someone took on the "waif-obsessed fashion industry", and
2. In a contest with Charlotte's beauty, the "waif-like catwalk models" don't stand a chance!

- Charlotte Coyle fan pages


Last edited by HSG : 20th September 2006 at 08:04.
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Old 20th September 2006   #3
Kaitlynn
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Here we have yet another example of why the truly great plus-size models are such effective representatives for full-figured women. As so many British reporters have done before her, this writer absolutely raves about Charlotte's beauty, referring to her "stunning looks" and her "long blonde hair, huge aquamarine eyes and undeniable charisma." Just by being seen, Charlotte convinces everyone who encounters her that plus-size beauty actually exists, and shows what it really looks like.

This is what the ugly "reality campaigns" can never achieve. Those present a false opposition between thinness and homeliness. But when the contrast is between an emaciated model and a goddess like Charlotte Coyle, everyone realizes that the real "war" here is between artificial modern beauty, and true, timeless beauty.

I am always so inspired by Charlotte's courage. She isn't afraid to stand on principle, and to criticize the fashion industry on the points that it needs to be criticized on. She isn't trying to ingratiate herself, or protect her career. She's genuinely crusading on behalf of curvy girls.

I think the writer, Victoria Lambert, did a really fine job with this article. She framed the whole debate very well, avoided any juvenile double entendres or mixed messages, and wrote about Charlotte in an affirmative and thoughtful way.
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Old 20th September 2006   #4
MelanieW
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
This is an attempt to stop scarily underweight models stalking the runways like death on two legs...

Dr Jon Goldin of Great Ormond Street Hospital in London said yesterday that the glamourisation of emaciated women was significantly to blame for the number of seven-year-olds being treated for eating disorders...

"You can tell who has an eating disorder their bones are sticking out everywhere, their faces are emaciated and their eyes are saying 'feed me'. It is so sad someone had to die for this issue to be properly debated."

Those are just some of the sections of the article that I consider most important. In a way, the article itself is the first salvo in the war against emacation. It points out that there is no equivalency between starvation-chic and the kind of beauty that Charlotte represents. Plus-size beauty is beauty, while gauntness is repulsive.

Its like an "Emperors New Clothes" situation. People are looking around and saying, "Oh, you think skinny models are grotesque too?" The public is finally realizing that almost everybody is repelled by this look. "I thought it was just me," they are probably thinking. No, it was the majority opinion, all along.

And tragically, the corpse-like model appearance not only resembles death, but also causes it - as the tragic case of the South American model proves.
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Old 21st September 2006   #5
vargas
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Quote:
"The magazine editors told me they couldn't use larger models even sporadically as the designers didn't make any clothes big enough. Designers told me it cost too much money to create larger ranges."

A lame excuse if there ever was one. With the obscene amounts of money many in the Haute Couture fashion industry charge for their clothes, this simply doesn't hold water. They suffer from a deep-seated prejudice against feminine beauty, plain and simple. They have invested massive amounts of time, energy and money in maintaining the status quo. If they allowed goddesses like Miss Coyle to appear on the runway, or on the cover of one of their precious magazines, people would reject the pitiful androgynous images that they have carefully crafted and imposed on us, right out of hand.

But as the bans in Madrid and the UK show, once there is an impetus for change, that change cannot be stopped. I thank Charlotte for all of the good work that she's been doing to change the shape of the industry.

[Slight edit--HSG]

Last edited by HSG : 21st September 2006 at 03:33.
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Old 21st September 2006   #6
Emily
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

I find it extraordinary that twice now, Charlotte has made the cover of national newspapers in Britain. (How many plus-size models can make such a claim?) Every single full-figure retailer in the U.K should have been begging her to headline their campaigns immediately upon her arrival in England last year, and the fact that they didn't do so is a glaring case of a missed opportunity. Their lack of foresight is actually holding size celebration back. Amazingly, the mainstream press in Britain has recognized Charlotte's importance better than the British plus-size fashion industry has (so far).

Incidentally, kudos to the writer of this article for referring to Charlotte's TV documentary by its original name, Beauty Reborn, and not by the awful Channel 4 title.

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
Charlotte is now with the Close Models agency run by Harriet Close, who agrees with her. "The larger girls have fabulous skin and look incredibly healthy. I think women want to see models who look more like them who have a few curves."
This is wonderful news. I hope this agent recognizes Charlotte's potential, and helps her achieve the career she deserves. If so, curvy girls the world over will be the beneficiaries.
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Old 21st September 2006   #7
Chad
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
Madrid's decision to ban ultra-thin models follows the death of Luisel Ramos, 22, in Uruguay last month from a heart attack moments after stepping off a catwalk. She had been told to lose weight and had been existing on little more than fluids....

"It is so sad someone had to die for this issue to be properly debated."

I still can't believe this tragedy wasn't splashed across the cover page of every newspaper in the world - you know, in the areas where they usually post diet-industry-funded lies about nonexistent weight "epidemics." No plus-size models are dying on any catwalks, thank you very much.

But there's some good news. One British fashion show has decided to ban the skinniest models:

http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?NewsID=1054290

and in a rare example of an issue crossing party lines, female politicians of every ideological stripe are coming together in Britain to promote the ban on emaciated imagery in fashion.

As Charlotte says, it is a tragedy that it cost a model her life to give this issue the attention it deserves. This forum has been decrying underweight models for years, but sadly, nothing speaks louder than a human fatality.

Link here:

http://archive.gulfnews.com/article...1/10069017.html

The article begins as follows:

..............
Lawmakers support ban on ultra-skinny models

Evening Standard

Published: 09/21/2006 12:00 AM (UAE)


London: Women members of parliament from all political parties have urged the fashion industry to stop using "stick-thin" size-zero models on the catwalk.

The cross-party alliance at Westminster was forged in an attempt to protect young girls who feel pressured by the rise of the ultra-skinny look used by top designers.

Labour, Lib-Dem and Tory women backed the Evening Standard's campaign to end the use of models with size-four figures, equivalent to American size zero.

A Commons motion calling for greater responsibility from the industry is set to be tabled next month when Parliament returns from recess.
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Old 22nd September 2006   #8
renata
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
Elsewhere in the world, however, the Spanish edict has been met with equal amounts of cheer and scorn. The Mayor of Milan threatened to follow suit, while an Australian modelling boss declared it a "positive step" for the industry. But in New York the talk was of discrimination lawsuits and in Paris, well, "everyone would laugh", says Didier Grumbach, the head of the French Couture Federation.

That is incredibly cold-hearted. A model dies from malnourishment, and they would laugh? Young girls suffer from rampant anorexia because of their unnatural images, and they would laugh? How can anyone be so callous? What kind of people are they?

And as for "discrimination lawsuits," how can the fashion industry have the gall to talk about "discrimination" against thin models, when THEY have discriminated against curvy models for decades? THEY are the ones who are guilty of discrimination. Let them end their discrimination, if they supposedly hate discrimination so much.
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Old 22nd September 2006   #9
MelanieW
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Default Re: Charlotte Coyle in The Telegraph

Charlotte also appeared in yesterdays issue of The Sun. This is more of a tabloid newspaper, and the article isnt quite as good, but it does get Miss Coyles name out there, and helps the public grow aware of plussize modelling, so thats a good thing.

Link here:

http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,...430628,,00.html

The most promising quote:
The programme was a roaring success but privately I was having a battle with my agent over my weight...I soon realised the slimming was affecting my self-esteem.

Eventually I told the agent I couldn't work with her anymore and signed up to a new one who shares my view on what a plus-size model should look like.

Bravo to Charlotte for NOT caving in to this agents ridiculous demands. I wish ALL plussize models would take such a stance. Charlotte embodies what the public wishes plussize models would look like. The faux-plus look is an offense.

Im glad to hear that her current agent has a more enlightened viewpoint. I hope that translates into major campaigns in the U.K.
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Old 2nd October 2006   #10
HSG
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Default Re: Charlotte on the COVER of the Daily Telegraph!

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSG
Not only is this a marvellous article, but Miss Coyle even appears on the cover of the online edition of today's Daily Telegraph.

As a follow-up to this thread, we are pleased to say that earlier today, we finally received our print issue of the September 20th edition of The Daily Telegraph. While the screen captures (posted above) display the look of the Telegraph Web site on the day that Charlotte's article appeared in the paper, these scans show what the physical newspaper actually looked like.

As you can see, a graphic promoting the Charlotte Coyle story, featuring a headshot of the model placed against a screaming red background, and situated right under the paper's masthead, was by far the most prominent image on the Telegraph's cover page:

Click to enlarge

In fact, since newspapers are always folded across the middle, what the British public would actually have seen, when looking at the Telegraph on September 20th, would have been this:

Click to enlarge

Miss Coyle's picture, accompanied by a cover line that proudly identifies her as a "plus-size model," would have been the principal image that captured their attention.

This is yet another dream-come-true for aficionados of timeless beauty. For years, we have longed for the day when a gorgeous full-figured model would become so popular, that she would appear on prime-time network television, and on newspaper covers. Charlotte has now done both.

Incidentally, according to a page at the Telegraph Web site, the print edition of the newspaper has a circulation of 904,660. In other words, nearly a million more people became instant converts to size celebration, the moment that they saw Miss Coyle's image, and read the article about her.

Thanks in large part to Charlotte's increasing prominence, true beauty will be reborn, in the very near future . . .

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