The Judgment of Paris Forum

Go Back   The Judgment of Paris Forum > 2005-2012 > 2006: January - December
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 16th November 2006   #1
kirsten
Member
 
Join Date: August 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 61
Default ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

While perusing today's headlines, I came across a tragic story: ANOTHER model has died of anorexia.

MSNBC has the full report.

Notable statements from the article include the following:

"Take care of your children ... no money is worth the life of your child, not even the most famous (fashion) brand is worth this," her mother, Miriam Reston, told O Globo newspaper....Miriam spoke on national television and to local newspapers to highlight the tragedy. She said she had pleaded with her daughter to eat more and to see a doctor.

After reading this article, it seems now that the ban in Spain on underweight models was a sober, sane, and necessary decision. It's heartening that her mother made an effort, but parents can only do so much. The fashion industry must wake up and acknowledge its responsibility.

In a saner climate, tragedies like this would not occur.
kirsten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th November 2006   #2
Emily
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 517
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

This is an absolutely shocking and horrifying story. In case the article gets removed at some point, I will post the full text below.

..................
Brazilian model dies from anorexia

21-year-old Ana Carolina Reston weighed 88 pounds

Reuters
Updated: 12:39 p.m. ET Nov 16, 2006


RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - The mother of a Brazilian fashion model who died from complications of anorexia has made an emotional appeal for parents to take better care of aspiring young models.

The death of Ana Carolina Reston, 21, follows growing criticism of the use of underweight models in the fashion world, an issue given new significance after the death in August of Uruguayan model Luisel Ramos of heart failure during a fashion show in Montevideo.

Reston died on Tuesday in a Sao Paulo hospital from a generalized infection caused by anorexia, an eating disorder in which sufferers obsessively deprive themselves of food in pursuit of an ultra-slim look.

Reston weighed only 88 pounds (40 kg) and was about 5 feet 8 inches tall (1.72 meters) tall. Doctors consider this weight normal for a 12-year-old girl no more than about 5 feet (1.5 meters) tall.

“Take care of your children ... no money is worth the life of your child, not even the most famous (fashion) brand is worth this,” her mother, Miriam Reston, told O Globo newspaper.

She said her daughter had been trying to help her family with the money she made as a model.

Miriam spoke on national television and to local newspapers to highlight the tragedy. She said she had pleaded with her daughter to eat more and to see a doctor.

“She would reply, ‘Mummy, don’t mess me around,’” Miriam told O Estado de S.Paulo.

“Dictatorship of skinny look kills a model,” said the front-page headline of O Dia tabloid, which carried a picture of the dark-haired, big-eyed girl in lingerie.

Many top models come from Brazil and thousands of young girls from all walks of life dream of modeling careers, inspired by the international success of Gisele Bundchen or Adriana Lima.

Reston was not famous but she had worked abroad, including in Japan, and did some jobs for Giorgio Armani and the Brazilian model agency L’Equipe, which declined immediate comment.

In September, Spain caused a storm in the fashion world when Madrid barred models below a certain weight from its top fashion show. Models with a body-mass-index (BMI), which takes into account height and weight, of less than 18 were banned.

Reston’s BMI was just 13.5 while the World Health Organization considers anyone with a BMI below 18.5 underweight. A BMI below 17.5 being one of the criteria for the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and a BMI nearing 15 is usually used as an indicator for starvation.

Other famous fashion venues like London were considering following suit.

- - - - -

I think the most heartbreaking point is what the article says about the mother: "She said she had pleaded with her daughter to eat more and to see a doctor."

I wonder what the apologists for the fashion industry will say to this? I've seen models -- even plus-size models, in a disgusting betrayal of everything they're supposed to stand for -- go on national TV and try to defend the fashion industry's attempts to deflect blame from themselves, saying it's "the family's responsibility." Well, here you have a mother who tried to get her daughter to stop starving herself, tried to get her to see a doctor, but she was powerless. What could she do, lock her daughter up and force her to take in nutrition?

The mother was powerless against the industry that had completely enslaved her daughter's mind, and warped her perceptions, as surely as if she had become part of a cult.

How many more deaths -- deaths -- will it take until someone recognizes how poisonous the fashion industry's starvation standard really is?
Emily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th November 2006   #3
vargas
Member
 
Join Date: March 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 71
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

I wonder how long this phenomenon has gone on. Until very recently, one never even heard a peep from the media or the fashion industry about young models dying from anorexia. I suspect many have died, and that it is only now coming to light for the public to see.

When Spain imposed the ban on underweight models, the industry insiders in Paris laughed derisively, as if it were all a joke. When the news that Luisel Ramos died, most people in the industry remained unmoved, as if the girl's life were worth nothing.

I wonder, now that another girl has died, if they are still finding the phenomenon of young women dying to be thin amusing.
vargas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th November 2006   #4
M. Lopez
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 2005
Posts: 587
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

Another article about this tragedy appears here:

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2006...rexic_Model.php

One excerpt:
"I noticed something was wrong when she returned from Japan," her mother told the Estado de Sao Paulo newspaper. "She was too thin ... and when I told her to eat something, she would say: 'Mom, please don't fight with me. There is nothing wrong with me, I'm fine.'"

Uh-huh. "Fine" by warped fashion-industry standards, which literally means dying.

I looked around for reports of this story on the TV broadcasts, the newspapers - you know, the ones that constantly promote diet-industry-funded myths about weight "epidemics" - and sure enough, there's barely a peep about this heartbreaking tragedy.

So minus-size models are dying, and the media still claims that being fuller figured is unhealthy. The lies never end. No plus-size models are dying on any runways. They're healthy and beautiful. Death is a clear indication of where the health peril really lies.

I fully expect fashion-industry insiders to try justifying themselves again with cynical protestations that no one should "discriminate" against their rights - in other words, that no one should "discriminate" against their lethal standards, that no one should "discriminate" against their "right" to require models to kill themselves, to literally die, for their sick amusement.

They are frankly nothing but starvation pushers - and as cold and indifferent to the misery caused by the poison that they peddle as are the pushers of any narcotic.

When will a law finally be passed in this country to end their tyranny, the way Madrid passed its sane and necessary law against underweight models? Regardless of how libertarian anyone may be, when people are dying, that's a clear indication that a law is needed, for the protection of society and its members. When will a law be passed here?
M. Lopez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th November 2006   #5
Kaitlynn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 633
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily
I wonder what the apologists for the fashion industry will say to this? I've seen models -- even plus-size models, in a disgusting betrayal of everything they're supposed to stand for -- go on national TV and try to defend the fashion industry's attempts to deflect blame from themselves,

This is really the worst kind of betrayal. It suggests an almost pathological self-centredness on the part of any such apologists. They are basically saying, "As long as MY career is okay, who cares how many other people are suffering- even dying?" Selling out full-figured women for the sake of a few editorials or campaigns. It's sickening.

And the fashion industry's "discrimination" defense is so hypocritical that anyone who accepts it is either a dupe, or wilfully blind. THEY, the moguls of the fashion world, run an industry based on systematic and tyrannical discrimination against full-figured women, and THEY have the gall to say, "Don't discriminate against our choices" - in other words, "Don't discriminate against OUR ability to discriminate, to continue acting like petty tyrants."

So the fashion-industry types believe that they should be allowed to discriminate at will, and everyone should simply accept the toxic standards they enforce- even if the face of actual model deaths? How can society submit to this? How can anyone be so foolish as to be suckered in by this "defense"?

This is a grim example (and not an isolated one) of how the concept of "discrimination" is cynically abused for petty personal gain.

In many ways, the people who run the fashion industry are like the worst kind of children: cruel and remorseless, with zero sense of personal accountability for the harm they cause. And until someone sets their boundaries, they will continue to tyrannize- as they have been for decades. They can never, and will never, behave responsibily. The Madrid solution is the ONLY solution.
Kaitlynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th November 2006   #6
MelanieW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 441
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

Quote:
Originally Posted by vargas
I wonder how long this phenomenon has gone on. Until very recently, one never even heard a peep from the media or the fashion industry about young models dying from anorexia. I suspect many have died, and that it is only now coming to light for the public to see.

I have no doubt that youre right about this. No one even heard of the Luisel Ramos tragedy until the Madrid ban started getting worldwide attention. If it hadnt been for that, her death would have been hushed up completely.

In a way, these model deaths due to anorexia take modern-day fashion to its (horrifying) logical conclusion. The designers constantly put models on the runway who have a cadaverously thin appearance, with jutting bones and protruding ribcages, like walking corpses. It is a Death Aesthetic, and these tragedies are the logical fulfillment of that inhuman, anti-life aesthetic.

I have a grim vision in my mind of a truthful fashion show - a runway show consisting of a parade of coffins, signifying all of the models, and all of the women, who have died of the anorexia that these fashion designers have promoted.

What surprises me is that while animal-right activists regularly picket runway shows, and cause disturbances over the use of fur, no one protests on behalf of the young girls who die due to the starvation standards of the fashion industry. If the animal deaths merit a protest, then where are the protests over the human deaths that the fashion world is causing? Are these girls lives somehow less significant - not even important enough to warrant a similar uproar? What kind of messed-up priorities are those?
MelanieW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st November 2006   #7
vargas
Member
 
Join Date: March 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 71
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

Quote:
Originally Posted by MelanieW
What surprises me is that while animal-right activists regularly picket runway shows, and cause disturbances over the use of fur, no one protests on behalf of the young girls who die due to the starvation standards of the fashion industry. If the animal deaths merit a protest, then where are the protests over the human deaths that the fashion world is causing?

You know I haven't thought about it like that, but you bring up an important point. And you are right - it IS a Death Aesthetic that is being promoted. The fact that many young women starve themselves, ruin their reproductive organs and their general health because they are required to do so in order to make it in the industry shows a total lack of regard and respect for human life by the self-appointed arbiters of fashion.

Not to belabor the point, but the ideas found in Modernism and Postmodernism have fuelled this lack of respect for life in general. Deconstructing everything, including the female form, tearing down anything that isn't "new," disdaining timeless ideas and traditions, and destroying what is beautiful -- these movements are cental to the problem. It is why supermodels, fashion desiners, and editors can make nonsensical statements like: "Clothes look better on hangers, and thin models look more like hangers," and no one bats an eyelash. The woman's body has now been deconstructed down to a wire frame, her true womanly beauty ignored. Never mind that in doing so, her health and life are in jeaopardy.
vargas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th November 2006   #8
HSG
Administrator
 
Join Date: July 2005
Posts: 1,784
Default Re: ANOTHER model DIES of anorexia

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
I fully expect fashion-industry insiders to try justifying themselves again with cynical protestations that no one should "discriminate" against their rights - in other words, that no one should "discriminate" against their lethal standards, that no one should "discriminate" against their "right" to require models to kill themselves, to literally die, for their sick amusement.

They are frankly nothing but starvation pushers - and as cold and indifferent to the misery caused by the poison that they peddle as are the pushers of any narcotic.

Your analogy works on many levels. As proved by the fact that Kate Moss was welcomed back into the fashion-industry fold after being arrested for drug possession, this is an industry that promotes life-threatening addictions of every kind. It should come as no surprise that it pushes starvation-addiction as well (which is what anorexia literally is--an addiction to starvation).

Nothing has actually changed since the horrors of "heroin chic," except for the fact that the mass media now turns a blind eye to the fashion industry's abuses (and worse, it often exacerbates them).

It is ludicrous to think that fashion's power-brokers will ever change their ways willingly. Their perverted tastes run contrary to womanly curves, so these self-appointed arbiters of culture will continue to demand that models waste away into skeletal nothingness, regardless of the death toll.

Only an enforcable decree from outside the industry, such as the Madrid ban, will end this criminal behavour.

In a way, it is unjust that so much attention is being focused on the deaths of two fashion models, when tens of thousands of women die of anorexia--none of whom ever merit a mention in the press. However, at least the attention to these particular tragedies underscores the fashion industry's culpability in causing and exacerbating anorexia.

The solution, as Dr. Dittmar's research proves, is to institute a top-to-bottom reform of the fashion industry, a revamping that will retain and preserve the industry's photographic, cosmetic, and design craftsmanship, but devote this artistry to the celebration of natural, full-figured feminine beauty (as exemplified by plus-size models), rather than today's destructive, androgynous standard.

Stunning Christina Schmidt, from her Fadil Berisha test shoot--embodying the possibility of a life-affirming fashion industry of the future:

- Click her to view the above image at a larger size

HSG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 19:38.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.