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Old 30th November 2006   #1
M. Lopez
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Join Date: August 2005
Posts: 587
Default ''Just Say No to Emaciated Women''

I found a post that deserves to be shared here, from a Web log that I usually avoid like the plague (but hey, exceptions can be made for this important topic).

The direct link is here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/irena...d-_b_35108.html

but I'll post the bulk of the text below, in case the post vanishes at some point.

......................
Just Say No to Emaciated Women

11.28.2006


Beautiful Ana Carolina Reston from Brazil died from complications of anorexia on November 14. She was only 21 and the second model to die from this insidious disease in the last two weeks.

When is the fashion establishment going to take responsibility for what is happening to women in our culture? When are we going to stop rewarding our young celebrities - like Nicole Ritchie - for not eating by following them doggedly and featuring them on the covers of our magazines?

Where are the Julie Campbells of this decade? The great editor of Sports Illustrated, Julie would tell you to EAT - that men wanted to see curves, hips and healthy looks...

Life and Style, among too many other magazines, are promoting death by celebrating a young girl's struggle with a lack of food. Let's instead print Kate Winslet's words all over the pages. She is the beacon of what is normal, albeit a gorgeous specimen, but one who is trying to be a role model to young women. To that, I say, Thank You Kate.

Editors - listen to the call. It is your responsibility to the culture of women. We buy what you are selling but now it has gone to the place of skeletal dimensions. And while we're at it, what about the faces of Plastic insanity - lips the size of amazon fish...Even in Hollywood, the vanity capital of the world, directors are beginning to forbid the use of Botox so their actors can emote - or actually have some kind of expression on their faces...

- - - - - - -

The one thing that I like about this post is that, for once, instead of complaining about an amorphous entity like "the media" or "the fashion industry," the writer identifies some of the real culprits behind the androgynous aesthetic - the ones who promote it through their model choices, and the ones who could change it, if the wanted to: the magazine editors of the publishing world.

True, the designers must be made to come around as well, since they create the fabled "sample sizes" that the magazines shoot for their layouts. But if an editor stated, point blank, that she would only be shooting size-14 samples or higher, the designers would have no choice but to start creating fashions for curvier, more womanly, more feminine shapes.
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Old 30th November 2006   #2
klara
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Default Re: ''Just Say No to Emaciated Women''

Kate Winslet is by far one of my absolute favorites. I adore her. I think it is a good thing to put pressure on different sides of the industry.
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Old 30th November 2006   #3
Kaitlynn
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Default Re: ''Just Say No to Emaciated Women''

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
Life and Style, among too many other magazines, are promoting death by celebrating a young girl's struggle with a lack of food. Let's instead print Kate Winslet's words all over the pages.

Coincidentally, Kate Winslet was on Showbiz Tonight yesterday, and spoke extensively about body image. The transcript of the whole program is posted here:

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRI.../29/sbt.01.html

but here is the specific text of Kate Winslet's interview:

................
ANDERSON: You've been very vocal about your criticism of the obsession to be super, super skinny in Hollywood. In fact, in Style Magazine you recently said, it seems to me they are breeding a whole new generation of anorexics.

WINSLET: There you go.

ANDERSON: Do you think it's gotten that serious, that bad?

WINSLET: Yes, I do. I absolutely do. I think it is completely out of control, I really do. And do you know what the sad thing is? There isn't anything anybody can do about it.

ANDERSON: Why not? What can be done? Because people are wasting away.

WINSLET: I know. I don't know what it is. I mean, I think it is just a lot to do with the way the media obsess over this and keep talking about it and keep putting it in magazines. That's the thing that young girls look at. I mean, we do not have magazines in our house because, you know, this is the stuff that children are being exposed to. And, you know, kids should be just kids and allowed to be kids for as long as they have the right to be. And so it does frighten me. But I mean, please, you know, if you have any suggestions, tell me.

ANDERSON: I'm at a total loss. And you mentioned the magazines. You have experienced the photo retouching, the digital manipulation, and it made you angry.

WINSLET: Yes. I mean, the truth is, you know, being on magazine covers and doing photo shoots is actually, on the one hand, really enjoyable. It is a lot of fun, and it is very much a part of my job. Now, you know, I know that images of women on the front of magazine covers have been retouched for years and years and years, decades we're talking about. But there was one particular situation in which my image was so fundamentally altered that it was like, no, no, this is going against my morals here, and I've had nothing to do with this. And I felt it was very important to come out and say that, because I didn't want people to think that that was how I looked. It was -- they honestly made me look a two and not a six or an eight or whatever. And I just didn't like it. I felt very kind of -- I felt used actually.

ANDERSON: It's admirable that you stood up for that.

WINSLET: Well, you know, life's too short.

ANDERSON: And you're so comfortable in your own skin. It is really refreshing. In fact, you have been nude in a number of films. And I heard that for Little Children, tell me if I'm right about this, that you did not want to tone up...

WINSLET: Well, exactly right. I mean...it was about the character. I mean, I'm playing a woman who is...a mother. You know, she doesn't go to a gym. She wouldn't know the meaning of the word yoga. And so I thought, well, it doesn't make sense that I would have some kind of super fit...body, just because I'm in a movie. You know, it's about being real and being that person. And also, yes, I mean, I am in normal shape and it is important to me to kind of say, look, you know, it's OK. Go have a burger.

ANDERSON: You can.

WINSLET: Yes, exactly.

ANDERSON: You can feel great about it. And there is a theme in this movie about that as well, when Cameron's character says, I just want to eat carbs.

.....................

Winslet's remarks are helpful, but it's disappointing that both she and the host throw up their hands and say "There isn't anything anybody can do about it." The writer of the article that M. Lopez posted correctly states that something can be done.

Every time a designer makes a dress in a sample size 0 rather than a sample size 16, that's a choice- the wrong choice.

Every time a magazine editor books a model who is a size 2 rather than a size 18, that's a choice- the wrong choice.

Every time a director casts an actress who is a size 4 rather than a size 14, that's a choice- the wrong choice.

Individual people are making these decisions. It's not caused by tidal action, or by fluoride in the water. It's just anti-plus individuals imposing their will on the culture. If these specific designers, and specific editors, were compelled to make different choices, the whole culture would change- for the better.
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Old 30th November 2006   #4
Chad
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Default Re: ''Just Say No to Emaciated Women''

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaitlynn
ANDERSON: And...tell me if I'm right about this, that you did not want to tone up...

WINSLET: Well, exactly right...I am in normal shape and it is important to me to kind of say, look, you know, it's OK. Go have a burger.

Some nice comments there by Ms. Winslet. It's especially encouraging to hear her speaking out against "toning." That word is just gym-industry propaganda for making women look androgynous and ropy-muscled, the way most tanorexic Hollywood types do. Becoming "toned" is the surest way of destroying feminine beauty, probably even worse than dieting.

To throw in something a little different (and positive) into this discussion, according to a widely-publicized news item, Ms. Winslet's curves actually inspired the creation of a new sportscar. It's really nice to hear of a designer (in any field) finding Winlet's soft curves more inspiring than, say, Kate Moss's protruding ribcage, or Madonna's repulsive physique. I suppose this is the modern, technological equivalent of sculptors of the past being inspired to carve the figures of voluptuous models in marble.

Here's the pertinent text:

-------------
Kate's curves inspire racy new Jag

November 27, 2006 12:00am


SHE is the actress dubbed the Queen of Curves who stood on the bow of the Titanic. It is the marque that for decades has boasted a leaping cat on its bonnets.

Suddenly and somehow the two have fused. Kate Winslet, 31, has confessed that her well-upholstered frame was the inspiration for Jaguar's new $150,000 coupe, the XK8. Gone is the cat. In its place are soft curves and a "smiley mouth" grille.

Winslet has revealed that she was in the mind of Ian Callum, a Scottish engineer, when he was designing the latest Jaguar XK. She told the American chat show host Jay Leno that Callum had "decided that I, for whatever reason, was his ideal woman. So I guess he was inspired by the shape of my body, which is kind of flattering"...

Winslet read about Callum's comment in a magazine called Hollywood Life.

Last week, Callum, Jaguar's chief designer who worked on the Aston Martin DB7, confirmed that Winslet was indeed his muse...

"Aesthetically some cars are very masculine - people have linked Astons with James Bond for obvious reasons, and the Vanquish is very like Pierce Brosnan. But a Jaguar should be sensuous and voluptuous, very sculptured and when I was thinking about it Kate Winslet came to mind.

"Kate Winslet is my ideal woman. She is naturally a very shapely woman...so I designed the new XK body with her in mind. The interesting thing is that so many women find sensual cars more appealing as well."

------------------

Now, what would really be a fine idea on Jaguar's part would be to produce ads and TV commercials showing a full-figured model promoting this marque, instead of the typical fashion waifs that usually appear in car commercials.

Last edited by HSG : 1st December 2006 at 22:40. Reason: Correcting typos
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Old 1st December 2006   #5
sama
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Default Re: ''Just Say No to Emaciated Women''

i think that anything which encourages the fashion industry, and, by default, most women, to realise that it is NOT NORMAL to be emaciated, is wonderful.

i have reached the personal point now where if someone suggests to me that i go on a diet, i simply cut them out of my life. they do not deserve to be included in it.

sama
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Old 1st December 2006   #6
HSG
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Default Just Say YES to Plus-Size Beauty

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Lopez
When is the fashion establishment going to take responsibility for what is happening to women in our culture? When are we going to stop rewarding our young celebrities - like Nicole Ritchie - for not eating by following them doggedly and featuring them on the covers of our magazines?

Where are the Julie Campbells of this decade? The great editor of Sports Illustrated, Julie would tell you to EAT - that men wanted to see curves, hips and healthy looks...

What a perceptive insight. The writer correctly asserts that the copious publicity which the press lavishes on underweight celebrities only encourages more food deprivation.

The thinking, on the part of the stars, is, "If so-and-so gets magazine covers for being malnourished (even if the headline is "scary skinny"), then I want that kind of attention too."

This is a product of the no-publicity-is-bad-publicity mindset which is so typical of the modern media--a warped logic that could only thrive in a morally-destabilized environment, such as that of modern Hollywood.

It plays into a basic adolescent impulse. In a very real sense, the celebrities "just want attention." Thus, even when the press sincerely wishes to point out how inhuman and unhealthy Hollywood's anorexic standard really is, their attempts to highlight the problem only exacerbate it.

What needs to happen--as the writer of the quoted article indicates--is that the media needs to fawn over visibly plus-size actresses, praising them for being full-figured, and applauding them for having unashamedly generous appetites (as recent articles about Kate Winslet and Nigella Lawson do).

The media must turn its attention to stars whose willingness to eat, rather than willingness to starve, is part of their publicity.

But all of this will be futile unless the celebrities who garner this kind of size-positive press attention are also sufficiently physically alluring to capture public interest.

The media spotlight cannot merely shine on stars who have a "lifestyle" look, nor on those who are dull and frumpy (the Camryns Manheims, the Rosies O'Donnells, etc.), but rather, on those who are threateningly, exotically gorgeous.

Catherine Zeta-Jones was just such a thrillingly curvy actress, for a little while, as was Hilary Duff, but both tragically diminished their subversively full figures due to relentless industry pressure.

The unbridled sensuality of Christina Schmidt, producing a rapacious look that is surely one of the more exciting expressions that any plus-size model has ever produced:

Christina easily matches and surpasses the allure of any of Julie Campbell's Sports Illustrated swimsuit models.

- Click here to view the above image at a larger size


Last edited by HSG : 2nd December 2006 at 06:27.
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